Systems thinking for evaluation design

From Sjon van ‘t Hof’s always brilliant blog – and Bob Williams is always someone to look out for.

Transcript, summary, and concept map
During March 25-26, 2015, Bob Williams, the main author of Wicked Solutions and several other books on systems thinking, gave a workshop “Wicked Solutions: A Systems Approach to Complex Problems” on the use of the systems approach in evaluation design at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) in Kyoto, Japan. RIHN is a development organization that conducts practical transdisciplinary studies of development problems and their solution. Some of the researchers participating in the workshop were involved in peatland management research on Bali and Sulawesi, Indonesia. Peatland is a major part of coastal wetland geomorphology around the world (4 million km2). The catch (22) is that peat grows naturally, but the process is reversed when the land is drained for agriculture. Peat covers half of the Netherlands, where the peatlands – which are often already below sea level – subside to ever lower levels, while sea levels are rising. A small part of the 2-day workshop was taped on video, edited, and posted on Youtube in two 30-minute parts youtu.be/lFcWhGE7moQ and youtu.be/5RRHpXl2hrw. They are not about peat but about the principles of systemic design. The transcription and slides have been combined in a single pdf. This post contains a concept map and summary. Have fun.

CSL4D

Transcript, summary, and concept map

During March 25-26, 2015, Bob Williams, the main author of Wicked Solutions and several other books on systems thinking, gave a workshop “Wicked Solutions: A Systems Approach to Complex Problems” on the use of the systems approach in evaluation design at the Research Institute for Humanity and Nature (RIHN) in Kyoto, Japan. RIHN is a development organization that conducts practical transdisciplinary studies of development problems and their solution. Some of the researchers participating in the workshop were involved in peatland management research on Bali and Sulawesi, Indonesia. Peatland is a major part of coastal wetland geomorphology around the world (4 million km2). The catch (22) is that peat grows naturally, but the process is reversed when the land is drained for agriculture. Peat covers half of the Netherlands, where the peatlands – which are often already below sea level –…

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