What is Shared Meaning and why does it matter? • Meaning Guide – Steve Whitla

source:

What is Shared Meaning and why does it matter? • Meaning Guide

What is Shared Meaning and why does it matter?

 Steve Whitla13 hours agoAdd comment

I started using the phrase “shared meaning” a couple of years ago to describe the outcome we were focusing on in the organisations we were working with, but I wasn’t prepared for just how quickly the phrase came to be taken up by clients, colleagues and the world at large. It became the subtitle of the book I co-wrote earlier this year, and the more I talk about it, the more I hear it in other people’s conversations. While I ponder how on earth to find time to write another full-length book on the subject, here’s a short summary of what I mean by shared meaning, and why I think the world needs it.

Shared meaning is two things: one is the outcome we are seeking to achieve, and the other is the discipline that seeks to achieve that outcome. The outcome is defined at greater length elsewhere on this blog, but as a quick reminder:

continues in source:

What is Shared Meaning and why does it matter? • Meaning Guide

A cybersystemic framework for practical action | Ray Ison (not new c2014?)

A cybersystemic framework for practical action Ray Ison

(99+) (PDF) A cybersystemic framework for practical action | Ray Ison – Academia.edu

contains another diagram to add to the ‘useful maps of the development of systems, complexity, and cybernetics’

A solid BOND in your PLAY

arthur~battram…

In reply to Lady P’s magnificent post lockdown ludoethnographic piece here…

https://medium.com/@playkx/mortality-not-only-rats-and-hamsters-782b1e9580e6

Speaking of the play rebound – scientists can label it, but can’t understand it. And I think you have maybe done a similar incompleteness. ‘Mortality’ isn’t quite right either. On occasions like this, I get etymological on yo ass. Later maybe.

Now what the boffins call a rebound was probably (90%) observed in INDIVIDUAL rats.
Free Sturrockesque term for you – a lubound. It’s as good as any of his clever wordmanglings , like ludiddo, ffs.

But what you watched was a GROUP PHENOMENON.

And as I has said before, we don’t have any tools or concepts to talk about that, yet. All we have is parallel, solo and group play. That is stamp collecting, trainspotting, botany, not biology. I ‘m thinking that Maturana will have the answer to this. Its to do with ENACTING a STRUCTURAL COUPLING. Maturana…

View original post 367 more words

Gentle medicine could radically transform medical practice | Aeon Ideas

source:

Gentle medicine could radically transform medical practice | Aeon Ideas

Gentle medicine could radically transform medical practice

<img src="https://epsilon.aeon.co/images/afef287f-dd6f-4a6a-b8a6-4f0a09330657/idea_sized-kendal-l4ikccachoc-unsplash.jpg" alt="<p><em>Photo by Kendal/Unsplash</em>

Photo by Kendal/Unsplash

Jacob Stegenga

is a reader in philosophy of science at the University of Cambridge. He is the author of Medical Nihilism (2018) and Care and Cure: An Introduction to Philosophy of Medicine (2018). He lives in Cambridge.

1,200 words

Edited by Sam Haselby

Numerous criticisms of medical science have been articulated in recent years. Some critics argue that spurious disease categories are being invented, and existing disease categories expanded, for the aim of profit. Others say that the benefits of most new drugs are minimal and typically exaggerated by clinical research, and that the harms of these drugs are extensive and typically underestimated by clinical research. Still others point to problems with the research methods themselves, arguing that those once seen as gold standards in clinical research – randomised trials and meta-analyses – are in fact malleable and have been bent to serve the interests of industry rather than patients. Here is how the chief editor of The Lancet medical journal summarised these criticisms in 2015:

Afflicted by studies with small sample sizes, tiny effects, invalid exploratory analyses, and flagrant conflicts of interest, together with an obsession for pursuing fashionable trends of dubious importance, science has taken a turn towards darkness.

These problems arise because of a few structural features of medicine. A prominent one is the profit incentive. The pharmaceutical industry is extremely profitable, and the fantastic financial gains to be made from selling drugs create incentives to engage in some of the practices above. Another prominent feature of medicine is the hope and the expectation of patients that medicine can help them, coupled with the training of physicians to actively intervene, by screening, prescribing, referring or cutting. Another feature is the wildly complex causal basis of many diseases, which hampers the effectiveness of interventions on those diseases – taking antibiotics for a simple bacterial infection is one thing, but taking antidepressants for depression is entirely different. In my book Medical Nihilism (2018), I brought all these arguments together to conclude that the present state of medicine is indeed in disrepair.

How should medicine face these problems? I coined the term ‘gentle medicine’ to describe a number of changes that medicine could enact, with the hope that they would go some way to mitigating those problems. Some aspects of gentle medicine could involve small modifications to routine practice and present policy, while others could be more revisionary.

continues in source:

Gentle medicine could radically transform medical practice | Aeon Ideas

The challenge of reclaiming the commons from capitalism | Aeon Essays

source:

The challenge of reclaiming the commons from capitalism | Aeon Essays

Economics for the people

Against the capitalist creeds of scarcity and self-interest, a plan for humanity’s shared flourishing is finally coming into view

Mousehold Heath (1810) by John Sell Cotman. Drawing on paper. According to the UK Government, between 1604 and 1914 enclosure Bills enacted by Parliament restricted access to formerly open communal land comprising just over a fifth of the total area of England. Courtesy the Trustees of the British Museum

Dirk Philipsen

is an economic historian and wellbeing economics advocate who teaches public policy and history at Duke University in North Carolina. He is also a senior fellow at the Kenan Institute for Ethics. His most recent book is The Little Big Number: How GDP Came to Rule the World and What to Do About It (2015).

Edited by Sam HaselbySYNDICATE THIS ESSAY

I’ve witnessed massive swarms of fireflies
grace my garden like never before, drawn
to the air cleansed of our arrogant greed,
their glow a flashback to the time before
us, omen of Earth without us, a reminder
we’re never immune to nature. I say this
might be the end we’ve always needed
to begin again …
– From the poem ‘Say This Isn’t the End’ (2020) by Richard Blanco

Abasic truth is once again trying to break through the agony of worldwide pandemic and the enduring inhumanity of racist oppression. Healthcare workers risking their lives for others, mutual aid networks empowering neighbourhoods, farmers delivering food to quarantined customers, mothers forming lines to protect youth from police violence: we’re in this life together. We – young and old, citizen and immigrant – do best when we collaborate. Indeed, our only way to survive is to have each other’s back while safeguarding the resilience and diversity of this planet we call home.

As an insight, it’s not new, or surprising. Anthropologists have long told us that, as a species neither particularly strong nor fast, humans survived because of our unique ability to create and cooperate. ‘All our thriving is mutual’ is how the Indigenous scholar Edgar Villanueva captured the age-old wisdom in his book Decolonizing Wealth (2018). What is new is the extent to which so many civic and corporate leaders – sometimes entire cultures – have lost sight of our most precious collective quality.

This loss is rooted, in large part, in the tragedy of the private – this notion that moved, in short order, from curious idea to ideology to global economic system. It claimed selfishness, greed and private property as the real seeds of progress. Indeed, the mistaken concept many readers have likely heard under the name ‘the tragedy of the commons’ has its origins in the sophomoric assumption that private interest is the naturally predominant guide for human action. The real tragedy, however, lies not in the commons, but in the private. It is the private that produces violence, destruction and exclusion. Standing on its head thousands of years of cultural wisdom, the idea of the private variously separates, exploits and exhausts those living under its cold operating logic.

continues in source:

The challenge of reclaiming the commons from capitalism | Aeon Essays

Book Announcement: Cynefin® – weaving sense-making into the fabric of our world – Cognitive Edge

source@

Book Announcement: Cynefin® – weaving sense-making into the fabric of our world – Cognitive Edge

Cognitive Edge

Skip to content

Video Thumbnail

Book Announcement: Cynefin® – weaving sense-making into the fabric of our world

Music: Battle Of The Creek by Alexander Nakarada | https://www.serpentsoundstudios.com Music promoted by https://www.free-stock-music.com Video clips: Peter Fowler, Peggy Johnson, Kelly Lacy, Treedo Footage, Why Steve and Vimeo from Pexels

source:

Book Announcement: Cynefin® – weaving sense-making into the fabric of our world – Cognitive Edge

Innovation at UNDP: changing ourselves, asking a different type of questions | by UNDP Innovation | Oct, 2020 | Medium

source:

Innovation at UNDP: changing ourselves, asking a different type of questions | by UNDP Innovation | Oct, 2020 | Medium

Innovation at UNDP: changing ourselves, asking a different type of questions

UNDP Innovation

UNDP Innovation6 days ago·6 min read

By Milica BegovicSoren Vester HaldrupGiulio QuaggiottoJennifer ColvilleLejla SadikuAlex Oprunenco

Seriously… “strategic” innovation?

So yes, the rumor is true: UNDP recently set up a Strategic Innovation Unit. And yes, we know what you are thinking…

Image for post

We explained part of the rationale behind this new chapter in our innovation journey in a previous post. The emergence of the need for a renewed focus on strategy at this particular juncture is perhaps better understood (with another nod to Yuen Yuen Ang!) as a result of co-evolution. In the last couple of years, UNDP launched a number of bold initiatives in the innovation space, such as the Accelerator Labs (which recently grew to 90 globally) and the Digital Strategy, aimed at “splicing digital into UNDP’s corporate DNA”. And this on top of a number of ongoing activities at the corporate and the regional level: from digital finance toNextGenGov Asia, from the “deep demonstrations” to Boost (just to name a few).

More importantly, the external context has also changed significantly. The COVID crisis has deepened pre-existing structural inequalities, bringing skeptics to question whether the SDGs framework is still relevant or indeed achievable. Against this backdrop, being able to demonstrate that a different mode of innovation is possible — a mode that is transformational, can dramatically change trajectories and embraces uncertainty — has acquired a new sense of urgency.

The shifting ground around us, a different type of demand from our counterparts and the availability of new organisational assets has gradually shifted the needle for UNDP, creating a new awareness of the potential of innovation for development but also generating important questions as to how those assets can be leveraged in a more systematic, transformational way. After all, as Rowan Conway reminded us, fast is not a direction.

Perhaps one way of visualizing the current organizational zeitgeist is through the Steinberg’s funnel

continues in source:

Innovation at UNDP: changing ourselves, asking a different type of questions | by UNDP Innovation | Oct, 2020 | Medium

Land Use and “The Cobra Effect” — Strong Towns

source:

Land Use and “The Cobra Effect” — Strong Towns

Land Use and “The Cobra Effect”

Image of a king cobra via Flickr user  Benjamin Michael Marshall .
Image of a king cobra via Flickr user Benjamin Michael Marshall.

Let’s start with a story. In rural India, there are cobras…

For many years, India was under British colonial rule. One day, a British fellow thought of an idea for reducing the number of cobras. He created a bounty system whereby folks were paid for each dead cobra they brought in. This worked for a while, but eventually people figured out that it was much easier (and more profitable) to bring in dead cobras they had bred and raised rather than trying to find them in the wild (and who wants to do that—it’s dangerous!).  The British authorities caught on and ended the bounty program; this was not what they intended. So what did the cobra breeders do with the leftover cobras? They let them loose in the wild of course, which led to there being more cobras than when the bounty system had begun.

Thus was born the phrase “The Cobra Effect,” or the law of unintended consequences: an attempt to solve a problem that in the process actually makes it worse.

There can be unintended consequences that result from our land use and infrastructure decisions. These decisions are generally intended to make our communities better, but they can actually make our communities worse off if we haven’t considered the longterm impacts.

Developers may pay to install public infrastructure, but local governments inherit the maintenance of it. Think about all of the pavement, sidewalks, water lines, sewer lines, parks…the list goes on. 

The same goes for projects funded by the federal government: the federal government…

continues in source:

Land Use and “The Cobra Effect” — Strong Towns

International Foundation for Systems Research Conversations (free) – European Bauhas/Systems Design 30 Oct 2020, 16:00 CET, and The Strategic Value of the Complex System Approach to Global Governance and Policy Modeling at the World Complexity Science Academy conference, 4 Nov 2020, 18:30 CET


IFSR Conversations: European Bauhaus/Systems Design
30. Oct. 2020, 16:00 to 17:00 CET


Pamela Buckle (IFSR) and Louis Klein (IFSR) are going to host the kick-off of our regular IFSR Conversations on Zoom. They picked Von der Leyen’s call to the European Bauhaus as the main topic for this first gathering. Von der Leyen links systemic change, sciences and design as the promising lead to meet the challenges of the Anthropocene in the 21st century. At the IFSR we believe that the systems community has more to offer than the community itself knows. So, let’s find out about our collective potential and the aesthetics of systemic solutions.

To participate in this IFSR Conversation just follow the link when it is time to start: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/88277524048.
If you like the convenience of a calendar invitation via e-mail, please contact us at conversations@ifsr.org.
 

IFSR Conversations at the WCSA conference
4. Nov. 2020, 18:30 to 19:30 CET


The World Complexity Science Academy (WCSA) is hosting an IFSR Conversation on
The strategic Value of the Complex System Approach to Global Governance and Policy Modeling.

The WCSA had to go online with its annual conference which was initially scheduled to be on the island of Ischia in the south of Italy. More information about the entire conference, which is free of charge for the systems community, you find at the WCSA website and you may request the current programme at the WCSA conference office.

To participate in the IFSR Conversation just follow the link when it is time to start: https://zoom.us/j/93727506720.
If you like the convenience of a calendar invitation via e-mail, please contact us at conversations@ifsr.org.

About maplesync – project maplesync – proposed cybernetic economic planning for Canada

source:

About maplesync – project maplesync

project maplesyncan open-source initiative that requires feedbackMenu

About maplesync

The “kernel” of the idea is project maplesync: an inclusive, open-source distributed economic decision making system for Canada. (plain language summary to follow below)

Maplesync is a proposal for open-source national level accounting and strategic indicative planning systems that anyone can contribute to. The idea is that by providing better baseline information to entrepreneurs (and more) we can build capacity for greater prosperity in terms of economic, social and environmental wealth.

Indicative planning simply means to draw attention to strategic options via collective intelligence design techniques.

Access the (under development) Github and Wiki by clicking on these links.

Maplesync was originally conceived by @gceh&… more info at www.gceh.ca, and you can add him on LinkedIn.

plain language summary: (shareable Google Doc link available on main page)

MAPLESYNC: a collaborative strategic planning process for Canada

How might we share strategic information to improve economic, social and environmental prosperity?

Introduction:

We have the opportunity to participate in economic decisions every day, including selling, renting and, mostly, buying products and services. From the micro level, these decisions contribute to the collective use of knowledge in society. Our decisions shape other decisions, from the bottom up, for the rest of the economy. 

But what about the big, macro decisions? The strategies and plans? People aren’t normally involved, on a daily basis, in the strategic planning of companies or governments – let alone of an entire country.

But what if they were involved, in real time?

What if regular people on a mass scale had the chance to collectively indicate, or point attention to, opportunities and directions which a national economy could rally around and make happen?

This is exactly what maplesync intends to make possible as a grand project.

Overview: 5 W’s:

What is maplesync?

Project maplesync is a blueprint to lay the foundations for systems that answer the above “how might we” question: How might we share strategic information to improve economic, social and environmental prosperity?

Maplesync lays out the possibilities of crowdsourcing strategic plans, plans that provide a roadmap into the future, at the national level. These strategic plans will point attention to areas of economic concern and generate ideas for addressing these concerns. 

In other words, a large group of Canadians could collaborate online to co-create a plan that helps meet the needs of Canadians by identifying opportunities, collecting and filtering ideas. This gives participants the ability to pool their collective intelligence to co-create plans from a great variety of different vantage points.

These plans would not be binding, but will act as more than a petition as they lay stepwise, integrative directions that concentrate attention and action. Individuals, entrepreneurs, innovators, companies, nonprofits and governments would be able to coordinate action around these plans as the benchmark.

source:

About maplesync – project maplesync

Bristol University Press | Anarchist Cybernetics – Control and Communication in Radical Politics, By Thomas Swann

source:

Bristol University Press | Anarchist Cybernetics – Control and Communication in Radical Politics, By Thomas Swann

Anarchist Cybernetics

Control and Communication in Radical Politics

By Thomas Swann

Published19 Oct 2020

Page count190 pages

SeriesOrganizations and Activism

ISBN978-1529208788

Dimensions234 x 156 mm

ImprintBristol University Press£75.00 £60.00You save £15.00 (20%)Add to basket
Click to order from North America, Canada and South AmericaShare           

Recommend to library

Google Preview

source:

Bristol University Press | Anarchist Cybernetics – Control and Communication in Radical Politics, By Thomas Swann

Patterns of Strategy Training – Agile strategy for a fast-paced world | paid training time for the UK and Australia Nov/Dec 2020

source (LinkedIn post)

Patterns of Strategy Training Agile strategy for a fast-paced world | LinkedIn

Patterns of Strategy Training Agile strategy for a fast-paced world

  • Published on October 22, 2020

Patrick HoverstadtDirector and management consultant at Fractal3 articles Following

Together with Thompson Organisations in Australia,we’re running some training on Patterns of Strategy online, starting in November 2020.

No alt text provided for this image

Normally we’d deliver this face to face, but for obvious reasons we’re doing it remotely using our Strategy War Room. You can sign up for a 4 session introduction to the approach (equivalent to one full day in total) or for a 12 session certification course (three full day equivalents in total) which will prepare you to develop strategy using the Patterns of Strategy approach for your organisation or clients.

The purpose of strategy is to build advantage for the organisation to ensure its success and survival, so that it can survive and thrive in a changing business environment. The challenge today is that the rate of change in the environment is so much faster than in previous decades – how do you develop and execute strategy at a higher tempo, to avoid your strategy being obsolete by the time you are implementing it? That means you need different ways to develop strategy. Those need to handle the turbulent trading conditions you encounter, and ideally make it possible for you to exploit them as well. Patterns of Strategyis effective in the challenging conditions which are so common today, as it helps you develop strategy which will enable your organisation to survive and be successful.

Patterns of Strategyis a revolutionary approach to strategy development that reveals and utilises the hidden drivers of emergent strategy. We develop strategy as a series of manoeuvres between all the actors, from competitors to partners, from the regulator to the marketplace. It gives you a framework and new vocabulary to understand the underlying strategic forces in your environment, so that you can tap into them and use them to your advantage. It’s effective and simple to use, yet extremely powerful and very fast.

Who is it for?

Anyone who needs to develop strategy, whether a fulltime strategist, a manager of a unit or a consultant. The approach works equally well for small or large organisations, or units within an organisation, and has been used successfully across all sectors and types of organisation, including public and third sector organisations. You can see more about the approach here.

What do you get?

No alt text provided for this image

The training mixes input with lots of practice. You’ll be working in a group to apply the approach to a live strategic issue you are facing. Allowing for confidentiality, group work will allow you to support others on their strategic issue, and of course there’s valuable learning for you in being exposed to a range of strategic situations besides your own. The training may also include case material. On the one-day course you’ll also get a copy of the Patterns of Strategy book which describes the theory and the practice and gives you 80 proven strategies covering a wide variety of strategic situations.

On the introduction course (four 2 hour sessions) you’ll:

  • master the six elements in Patterns of Strategy which drive the dynamics of your position in your ecosystem or market
  • be attuned to how your strategic situation is likely to evolve, if you don’t intervene strategically
  • use the Patterns of Strategy to develop strategy
  • accelerate the speed at which you can develop strategy
  • you’ll leave having learnt the approach and having made substantial progress on your own strategic situation.
No alt text provided for this image

If you sign up for the full (three-day equivalent) certification workshop, we’ll go into the theory and practice in more depth and you’ll:

  • explore a range of strategic options, not just one, and learn how to assess them using different criteria, to grasp which gives you the best advantage
  • understand how to anticipate and counter moves by competitors
  • understand how to ensure your organisation has the capabilities to formulate and execute strategy
  • learn how to move from formulation to execution
  • use the 80 Patternsto accelerate your strategy development and extend your strategic repertoire
  • understand how to use your position in your ecosystem to your advantage
  • develop strategies for a range of strategic contexts including strategies for growth, defence, competition & collaboration

So you’ll leave the sessions with a much deeper understanding of the Patterns of Strategy approach, and a really well worked through strategy for the strategic context and issue which you brought to the sessions.

At the end of the full certification workshop you will get:

  • Certification as a Patterns of Strategy practitioner, assuming that we can see you handing strategic situations adroitly
  • Presentations you can use with clients or your organisation
  • Beta version of Patterns of Strategy software

We’ll also make the full Patterns of Strategy toolkit available.

Arrangements

Please get in touch by emailing strategytraining@fractal-consulting.com, to book, or to find out more about the training. Payment is required one week before the first session.

These workshops will be held online. The first four sessions will be held between 08:30 – 10:30 GMT / 9:30 – 11.30 CET / 19:30 – 21:30 AEDT on: 12th, 19th, 26th November and 3rd December.

Price for the initial 4 sessions is 1,500 AUSD / £800, and for the subsequent 8 sessions is 2,500 AUSD / £1,300 and for the full twelve sessions booked as a block is 3,500 AUSD / £1,900.

No alt text provided for this image

All prices exclude VAT / GST where applicable.

source (LinkedIn post)

Patterns of Strategy Training Agile strategy for a fast-paced world | LinkedIn

Leading Self, Leading Systems – applying Barry Oshry’s work, 1 and 8 Dec 2020, morning UK time (paid)

source:

Leading Self, Leading Systems Tickets, Tue 1 Dec 2020 at 09:30 | Eventbrite

Leading Self, Leading Systems – leading with greater courage, compassion and systems sight

Session One 0930-1130 GMT 1st December;

Session Two 0900-1300 GMT, 8 December

https://bit.ly/2TgnyCS

book: DEC 01 Leading Self, Leading Systems by Living Leadership & Partners Follow £250

Leading Self, Leading Systems Tickets, Tue 1 Dec 2020 at 09:30 | Eventbrite

Carlos Gershenson, “The Implications of Interactions…” ~ Stanford Complexity – YouTube

source:

Carlos Gershenson, “The Implications of Interactions…” ~ Stanford Complexity – YouTube

17:30 / 46:15

Carlos Gershenson, “The Implications of Interactions…” ~ Stanford Complexity

19 Dec 2017

Stanford Complexity Group

Carlos Gershenson is a professor at Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México. He studies Complex systems from various perspectives. Carlos’ site is: http://turing.iimas.unam.mx/~cgg/

source:

Carlos Gershenson, “The Implications of Interactions…” ~ Stanford Complexity – YouTube

“Leadership, Contexts, and Learning – Part 2. Theories of Learning, Cha” by Larry M. Starr, PhD

source

“Leadership, Contexts, and Learning – Part 2. Theories of Learning, Cha” by Larry M. Starr, PhD

Leadership, Contexts, and Learning – Part 2. Theories of Learning, Channels, and Curricula

Larry M. Starr, PhDThomas Jefferson UniversityFollow

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

10-2020

Abstract

In this second of a two-part essay (see Starr (2020a1) for part 1) a systems-informed discussion of learning leadership is presented. I review the components of a system which consist of inputs, transformation, outputs, feedback and contextual environment, and argue that from a system perspective learning leadership emerges from interactions among elements particularly contextual variables. The concept of context is expanded to include the theory of learning applied, i.e., pedagogy, andragogy or heutagogy, and the communication channel used, i.e., face-to-face, virtual/online, or hybrid/blended. Learning leadership is also influenced by environmental context variables such as threats to health and safety, financial and economic losses, political polarization, and cultural characteristics. The paper concludes with examples of how a systems approach can be used to select leadership content followed with examples for prototypical undergraduate, master and doctoral leadership courses.

Recommended Citation

Starr, PhD, Larry M., “Leadership, Contexts, and Learning – Part 2. Theories of Learning, Channels, and Curricula” (2020). School of Continuing and Professional Studies Faculty Papers. Paper 7.
https://jdc.jefferson.edu/jscpsfp/7

continues in source:

“Leadership, Contexts, and Learning – Part 2. Theories of Learning, Cha” by Larry M. Starr, PhD