The Cybernetics of the Two Wittgensteins:

Harish's Notebook - My notes... Lean, Cybernetics, Quality & Data Science.

In today’s post, I am looking at Wittgenstein and parallels between his ideas and Cybernetics. Wittgenstein is often regarded as one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. His famous works include Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (referred to as TLP in this article) and Philosophical Investigations (referred to as PI in this article). TLP is one of the most intriguing books I have read and reread in philosophy. His style of writing is poetic and the body of the book is split into sections and sub-sections. Wittgenstein is one of the few philosophers who has written two influential books that held opposing views in linguistic philosophy.

The Early Wittgenstein:

Wittgenstein was very much influenced by Bertrand Russel’s logical representation of mathematics. Wittgenstein came to the conclusion that language also resides in a logical space. He realized that the problems in philosophy are due to a lack of understanding how language…

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W. Brian Arthur on Complexity Economics – Sean Carroll’s Mindscape podcast

Complexity Digest

Economies in the modern world are incredibly complex systems. But when we sit down to think about them in quantitative ways, it’s natural to keep things simple at first. We look for reliable relations between small numbers of variables, seek equilibrium configurations, and so forth. But those approaches don’t always work in complex systems, and sometimes we have to use methods that are specifically adapted to the challenges of complexity. That’s the perspective of W. Brian Arthur, a pioneer in the field of complexity economics, according to which economies are typically not in equilibrium, not made of homogeneous agents, and are being constantly updated. We talk about the basic ideas of complexity economics, how it differs from more standard approaches, and what it teaches us about the operation of real economies.

Listen at: www.preposterousuniverse.com

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Late Great Engineers: Norbert Wiener – father of cybernetics | The Engineer The Engineer

Late Great Engineers: Norbert Wiener – father of cybernetics By The Engineer 15th September 2021 8:00 am

Late Great Engineers: Norbert Wiener – father of cybernetics | The Engineer The Engineer

The Complexity Evaluation Toolkit from CECAN

press release: New toolkit to help evaluate complex policies

Press Release from CECAN

toolkit:

Also:

their evluation framework for DEFRA:

Uvod u teoriju kompleksnosti | Meetup in Belgrade – Wed Sep 29, 17:55-19:25 CEST

Wednesday, September 29, 2021 Uvod u teoriju kompleksnosti Novi Milenkovic Hosted by Novi Milenkovic sensemaking.rs Public group ? Wednesday, September 29, 2021 5:55 PM to 7:25 PM CEST Add to calendar Impact Hub Belgrade Makedonska 21 · Beograd

Uvod u teoriju kompleksnosti | Meetup

Amara webinar: Transformation through inquiry – Amara Collaboration – the story of part of Bill Torbert’s developmental journey, 21 September 4-5pm CET

Amara webinar: Transformation through inquiry

Amara webinar: Transformation through inquiry – Amara Collaboration

Hear the inspiring story of Bill (William) Torbert – one of Amara’s founders – as he shares parts of his own developmental journey with us. A central theme in his development, and the transformations he has facilitated, is inquiry, especially the practice of Action Inquiry, which we use widely in our work in Amara. In the webinar we’ll discuss Action Inquiry personally with Bill, and learn practical ways of supporting transformation through inquiry. This free webinar takes place on Tuesday 21st of September at 4-5pm CET.Webinar in ZoomSeptember 21, 2021Free

The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It – Flyvbjerg (2021)

The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It Flyvbjerg, Bent and Dirk W. Bester, forthcoming, “The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It,” Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, accepted for publication. 25 Pages Posted: Bent Flyvbjerg University of Oxford – Said Business School Date Written: September 6, 2021

The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It by Bent Flyvbjerg :: SSRN

Ralph Stacey 10/9/1942 – 4/9/2021

Very sad to hear of the death of Ralph Stacey, here blogged most appropriately by Chris Mowles. I’m sure we will hear more tributes, remembrances, and reviews in the future.

Complexity & Management Centre

I am writing to let you know that I heard from Ralph Stacey’s family on Sunday that Ralph died peacefully in hospital on Saturday night after a short illness over the summer.

Many of you who follow this site may already know a lot about Ralph and will have met him in person. For those who didn’t know him, here is a brief obituary.

Ralph was trained as an economist graduating with his PhD from LSE in 1967. He came to Hatfield Polytechnic in 1985 having worked in corporate planning for the construction company John Laing, and having briefly been an investment analyst in the City of London. In the same year that the polytechnic became a university, 1992, Ralph was made a Professor of Management.

Ralph was one of the pioneers of adopting analogies from the sciences of complexity into theories exploring group dynamics in organisations. He published his…

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Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice – Sam Rye

Complexity•Sep 12, 2021

How can we work in organisations that don’t see complexxity, if we’re committed to embracing complexity in our practice?

Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice

Complexity•Sep 12, 2021

How can we work in organisations that don’t see complexxity, if we’re committed to embracing complexity in our practice?

Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice

1 new message

Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice

Complexity•Sep 12, 2021

How can we work in organisations that don’t see complexxity, if we’re committed to embracing complexity in our practice?

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management | Darya, Mar 20,2021

yes another one via Mikael Seppala

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management | Shortform Books

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management

Posted by darya | Mar 20, 2021Understanding Systems Thinking in Management

This article is an excerpt from the Shortform book guide to “Team of Teams” by Stanley McChrystal. Shortform has the world’s best summaries and analyses of books you should be reading.

Like this article? Sign up for a free trial here.

What is systems thinking? How does systems thinking apply to organizational management?

Systems thinking is a holistic approach to system analysis that focuses on examining the system as a whole by looking into how its constituent parts relate to one another. In systems thinking management, information is shared freely across the organization’s functions to facilitate collaboration.

Keep reading to learn about systems thinking in management.

continues in source

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management | Shortform Books

Horizon2020, Cities2030 (www.cities2030.eu); WP3 – Intelligence; Task 3.4 – Generate the project system thinking framework; D3.3 Systems Thinking Methodology

Horizon2020, Cities2030 (www.cities2030.eu); WP3 – Intelligence; Task 3.4 – Generate the project system thinking framework; D3.3 Systems Thinking Methodology

(PDF) Horizon2020, Cities2030 (www.cities2030.eu); WP3 – Intelligence; Task 3.4 – Generate the project system thinking framework; D3.3 Systems Thinking Methodology

UNDP Strategic Plan, 2022-2025

Mikael Seppala on the Systems Change Finland Slack says:

UNDP has systems at the forefront of their 2022-2025 strategy. cc @Arnaldo Pellini“UNDP works with countries to expand people’s choices for a fairer, sustainable future, to build the world envisioned by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with planet and people in balance. The challenge of the next four years is to accelerate and scale up development results significantly, bringing the Goals back within reach. Towards that end, UNDP will support change in three directions:• Structural transformation, particularly green, inclusive and digital transitions;
• Leaving no one behind, a rights-based approach centred on human agency and human development;
• Building resilience to respond to systemic uncertainty and risk.These are huge, whole-of-society puzzles that require collective efforts and integrated approaches. UNDP offers a unique network of global reach and local presence, sectoral expertise and trusted partnerships to help solve these puzzles. In the next four years, UNDP will work with countries to expand human capabilities through which 100 million people can escape multidimensional poverty; support access to clean energy for 500 million people; support 800 million people to participate in elections, many for the first time; and promote the investment of over $1 trillion of public expenditure and private capital in the Sustainable Development Goals.Powerful enablers – strategic innovation, digitalization and development finance – will further accelerate and scale results. To be an effective partner in transformative change, UNDP has to build not just new skills, like systems thinking, but a new culture: one that embraces complexity, actively manages risk, continually adapts and seeks to learn alongside delivering results. In an uncertain world, its business model must empower UNDP to respond to partners with the flexibility and at the scale they expect.”

https://undocs.org/DP/2021/28

Linnaeus University Systems Community (LNU-STC) | lnu.se

Linnaeus University Systems Community (LNU-STC)

Linnaeus University Systems Community (LNU-STC) | lnu.se

Input request: Using Systems Thinking to Understand the Barriers and Enablers of Gender Bias in Society and the Operational Research Profession

https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeNnaIQ8ead7YumklbayUha8a1QLPDJ67Vvjw4EkPi2A1O9CA/viewform

Systems: A User Perspective – Belinda Weir

My earlier use of ‘reblog’ in WordPress didn’t make it clear that this blog is from a valued colleague, not myself. I will be more careful in future. The link does go to Belinda’s blog:
https://bit.ly/3kMyGov

Systems Leadership, Lessons & Learning

A short reflection on the relevance of cancer to systems thinking

Since I was diagnosed with cancer 9 weeks ago I’ve thought a lot about what my experience can teach me about complexity and systems. Not every day. Some days I’ve curled up into a small ball, and wished cancer – and the diabetes that it caused, and the chemo that accompanies it, and the existential questions about life, death and the pursuit of happiness – would all just go away. But I was a systems thinker before I was a cancer patient. I see connections everywhere. I work with people trying to develop systems leadership approaches, explore systems thinking and gather evidence about how it is to work in uncertain, complex and volatile contexts.

Much of what I’m going through has relevance for systems work.

#1: Complex Identities

Taking up a systems leadership role isn’t a binary choice. Leaders…

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