New System Alliance

Very much about ‘changing the system’, so it’s debatable whether it’s systems thinking-related, but anyway, very interesting, certainly well funded, and very active right now.

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Homepage – New System Alliance

English | Cymraeg

New System Alliance Logo

ARE YOU TIRED OF A FAILING SYSTEM?

Together, we are allies working for a total change in the systems people come up against when they experience tough times.

Total Change

The New System Alliance is striving for total systems change, a paradigm shift, where people can take control and together, we can respond in a new way to finally make systems work for people

WHY?

The current system doesn’t work. Changing elements of a broken system and coming up with new approaches isn’t working.

Systems

We want to break down the constant focus on what’s wrong with people. We want to stop the approach that puts people on pathways rather than listening to them.

WHY?

People told us current systems often embarrass, humiliate and at worst, trap and institutionalise, often forcing people to sacrifice their dignity to survive.

Tough Times

The New System Alliance believes that people should not be defined by labels or negative situations. Tough times should be a brief transition in someone’s life – not an identity or a life sentence.

WHY?

The current system defines people by their weaknesses, rather than who they are as an individual, their unique context and their strengths.

WHAT’S NEXT

  • You believe that systems surrounding tough times need to change
  • You are open to new ideas, even the big scary ones!
  • You want to lead change alongside other like-minded allies

BECOME AN ALLY

Be a part of the change… 140 New System Allies and counting!

Latest Events

  • The New System Alliance
    4th December 2- 3:30The New System Alliance founding partners welcome everyone in to be part of this exciting and brave new home for lively conversation and most importantly, action!Register

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Learn More About The New System Alliance

Where did the New System Alliance come from?

After years of listening and learning from the realities of people’s lives and from the experiences of passing power and control back to people; Mayday TrustChanging LivesHomeless Network Scotland and Platfform all recognised the same problem – one of the biggest challenges people face going through  tough times is the system itself. So with the vital support of the National Lottery Community Fund, they have formed the New System Alliance to totally transform the system.

Page Links

Alliance Partners

About Us

New System Alliance is founded by Mayday Trust and Partners. Mayday Trust is a charity and company limited by guarantee, registered in England and Wales. Charity Registration Number: 1035524 Company Registration Number: 2911222

WHAT’S NEXT

  • You believe that systems surrounding tough times need to change
  • You are open to new ideas, even the big scary ones!
  • You want to connect with others who have an appetite for change

BECOME AN ALLY!

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Homepage – New System Alliance

ThreadReader compilation of discussions around a New System Alliance event

“Please, don’t make systems work for people, because this is […] everything that’s wrong with the sector. Making stuff work for others. Help people discover & steer and own their own pathways for a change” 😍

https://threadreaderapp.com/thread/1334928410473353217.html

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Thread by @SingleBlade1 on Thread Reader App – Thread Reader App

It’s time for better questions: Living up to the idea of as many as possible, as long as good as good as possible.

footblogball

It’s time for better questions: Living up to the idea of as many as possible, as long as good as good as possible

There is an ongoing discussion within youth football around the subject of ability grouping. The practice of early selection and de-selection of children through ages and stages are now central tenets of player development programs around the world (Güllich, 2014; Rongen et al., 2018) and have become a common point of departure for these discussions. Often pyramid like in structure, these type of development programs have been termed by Bailey and Collins (2013) as the Standard Model of Talent Development. Lacking in both empirical and conceptual validity this model is based on the presumption that development and performance in sport are conceptually linear and predictable (Bjørndal, Ronglan & Andersen, 2017).

Language precedes culture

More recently these models have come under media scrutiny (Shannon, 17 November 2020)…

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Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders – Centre for Public Impact (CPI)

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Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders – Centre for Public Impact (CPI)

DECEMBER 3, 2020 5 minute read

Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders

Asia & Oceania

LegitimacyInnovation

As we hurtle towards the end of 2020, now feels like a good time to stop and look back at the year that has been; a year of disruption and pain, but also innovation and opportunity. To support this process of reflection, the Observatory of Public Sector Innovation convened a series of global events under the banner of “Government After Shock”. Around the world, the Government After Shock events took different forms, and focused on different themes. But all were connected by three key questions – what do we need to leave behind, what do we want to keep, and what should we do differently?

CPI hosted three Government After Shock events from our teams across the globe – WashingtonLondon and Melbourne. This article captures our reflections from the Melbourne event, which explored Thinking in Systems in Government. Specifically, the session focused on exploring the following: 

To build on the momentum that COVID has generated around thinking in systems, what do we need to keep doing, believing and being; what do we need to leave behind, and what do we need to start doing, believing and being?

The discussion was led by Dr Seanna Davidson from The Systems School, Angie Tangaere from The Southern Initiative, Misha Kaur from the Australian Taxation Office, Professor of Systems Ray Ison from the Open University and Sam Rye from Conservation Volunteers Australia.

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Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders – Centre for Public Impact (CPI)

New Books Network | Ray Ison, “Systems Practice: How to Act In…

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New Books Network | Ray Ison, “Systems Practice: How to Act In…

Ray Ison

Nov 25, 2020

Systems Practice

How to Act In Situations of Uncertainty and Complexity in a Climate-Change World

SPRINGER 2017

While various systems theories have received rigorous treatments across the literature of the field, reliable and robust advice for systems practice can be somewhat harder to come by. Ray Ison has done much to remedy this state of affairs through his deeply theoretically grounded yet eminently practical book: Systems Practice: How to Act In Situations of Uncertainty and Complexity in a Climate-Change World which was reprinted by Springer in 2017. 

After first drawing a distinction between metaphors and the much less well-known notion of isophors, Ison builds a conception of the systems practitioners work around his central isophor of The Juggler. For Ison, the systems practitioner must keep four essential balls in the air. These are (1) the B-ball which concerns the attributes of Being a practitioner with a particular tradition of understanding; (2) the E-ball which concerns the characteristics ascribed to the ‘real-world’ situation that the juggler is Engaging with; (3) the C-ball which concerns the act of contextualising a particular approach to a new situation, and; (4) the M-ball which is about how the practitioner is Managing their overall performance in a situation. Interspersed with extensive excerpts from a wide array of systems practitioners such as Donella Meadows, Russ Ackoff and beyond, Ison blends cybernetics and systems in a rare and deft manner, and his thoughtful book, underwritten by years of fieldwork, makes a significant contribution to the systems literature by asking, in his own words, “What do we do when we do what we do?” The answers are as illuminating as the lively conversation we had about this book.

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New Books Network | Ray Ison, “Systems Practice: How to Act In…

Judith Rosen: The Modeling Relation And Anticipatory System Theory by Robert Rosen – YouTube

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Judith Rosen: The Modeling Relation And Anticipatory System Theory by Robert Rosen – YouTube

Judith Rosen: The Modeling Relation And Anticipatory System Theory by Robert Rosen

3 Dec 2020

Club of Remy

Discussion on Robert Rosen Judith Rosen, Lowell Christy, Jerry Chandler: Anticipation as the Signature of Life, and the Implications for Defining “Information” Because of It; Speed Dating of Ideas Club of Remy December 2, 2020

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Judith Rosen: The Modeling Relation And Anticipatory System Theory by Robert Rosen – YouTube

Critical Systems Thinking, William Burroughs, and David Bowie | Dr Mike C Jackson OBE on LinkedIn

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Critical Systems Thinking, William Burroughs, and David Bowie | LinkedIn

Critical Systems Thinking, William Burroughs, and David Bowie

  • Published on December 4, 2020

Dr Mike C Jackson OBE

Centre for Systems Studies

I have never thought it difficult to explain what critical systems thinking and practice are about. The world is increasingly throwing up complex problem situations which are beyond the scope of any one discipline to understand, let alone model. And there are multiple viewpoints on what is happening and what needs doing. All truths are therefore partial. The best way to get some handle on events is, therefore, to take a multi-perspectival approach on complexity using viewpoints that have proven their worth. Once an appreciation of the most pressing and significant issues is gained, in this manner, it becomes possible to make an informed choice of systems methodologies, models, and methods to use in combination to address the issues and seek improvement. The reason this is necessary is that even systems approaches cannot grasp the ‘whole system’. The various systems approaches available have different strengths and weaknesses and highlight and respond to different aspects of complexity. Understanding what the different systems approaches are good at, we can choose and use them appropriately according to the characteristics of particular problem situations, rethinking our strategy constantly as we learn whether we have made a sensible choice.

 Of course, it is always good to see the same argument rehearsed by others using different words. I have just come across a conversation between William Burroughs and David Bowie reported in Casey Rae’s new book ‘William S Burroughs and the Cult of Rock’n’Roll’. Burroughs is explaining to Bowie his vision for his ‘Final Academy’:

 “It’s aim will be to extend awareness and alter consciousness in the direction of greater range, flexibility and effectiveness at a time when traditional disciplines have failed to come up with viable solutions”

 He goes on:

 “We will be considering only non-chemical methods with the emphasis on combination, synthesis, interaction and rotation of methods now being used in the East and West”

 The context is different – expanding consciousness rather than problem resolving capacity – but the underlying philosophy is similar to that of critical systems thinking and practice. The key is to escape ‘control’ or ‘group-think’ and to entertain new ways of thinking about the complexity we face and the variety of methods we may have to employ to navigate it.

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Critical Systems Thinking, William Burroughs, and David Bowie | LinkedIn

Information Variety and VSM—The President’s Series Tickets, 13 Jan 2021 17:00 UK time|Cybernetics Society

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Information Variety and VSM—The President’s Series Tickets, Wed 13 Jan 2021 at 17:00 | Eventbrite

JAN 13

Information Variety and VSM—The President’s Series

by Cybernetics Society — President’s SeriesFollowing£0 – £2,000

Event Information

The President’s Series features distinguished speakers on issues of our time. This explores purposefulness and the ‘world we want to world’

About this Event

Hosted by our President, Dr. John Beckford FCybS, the CybSights President’s Series is a new programme that will bring interesting people together to explore the relevance and contribution of cybernetics to addressing important challenges.

Each event will consist of contributions by two different speakers. Each will be followed by individual Q&A. These are then brought together by the President in a lively and engaging plenary discussion. Each will seek areas of convergence and divergence between the ideas explored.

Events will be held via Zoom on the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 1700 to 1900.

Meetings are open to members of the Cybernetics Society and also the general public. Non-members are invited to join or give a donation. Booking is required.

The Cybernetics Society has been hosting conversations and lectures since the late 1960s.

#PS4 : January 13: Information Variety and the VSM Trialogue

Addressing the distinct “go” of cybernetics in oganisations, the two speakers discuss the role of information in the management of companies and society and the capabilities of the Viable System Model to assist this..

Introduction and Welcome: Dr. John Beckford, FCybS, President of the Cybernetics Society

FIRST SPEAKER

Dr. Peter Dudley , FCybS

The Trialogue: A Trinity in Four Parts

The Trialogue is an interpretation of Beer’s 3-4-5 homeostat which, conceptually, renders systemic identity open to question. And, therefore, that the historical ‘always-already-present-ness’ of identity usually applied in cybernetic modelling is a ‘special case’ – arising after the moment of the creation of self.

Whilst this notion of plasticity in identity might be contentious there is some evidence to support it. Kuhn’s “paradigm shifts” or Gould’s suggestion that cultural development is Lamarckian, for example, can be interpreted as social (scientific) identity, in the form of dominant modes of existence or thought being (or being rendered) plastic in relation to the current social environment. New forms arising and becoming established only if they can ‘square the circle’ of the demands of current capability and current challenges in any particular field.

Dr. Peter Dudley FCybS

Peter has a bachelor’s degree in Information Systems Design and a Ph.D. in Management Systems and Sciences. He is a fellow of the Royal Society for the Encouragement of the Arts and Manufactures, the Operational Research Society and the Cybernetics Society. Initially lecturing/researching ‘systems and cybernetics’ in H.E. he became an independent consultant/researcher working in the design and build of intelligent management systems. Most recently he has contributed to projects developing IT/S tools to model and support National Infrastructure and network failure resilience, climate change response and, most recently, Military C2 and non-Western Military doctrine.

Followed by discussion and Q & A

SECOND SPEAKER

Professor Elaine Toms, Professor of Information Innovation & Management, Sheffield University Management School

Subject and Bio to follow.

Followed by discussion and Q & A

Plenary Discussion

The aim of this session, moderated by John Beckford, is to draw out the complementary and competing ideas emerging from the two sessions.

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Information Variety and VSM—The President’s Series Tickets, Wed 13 Jan 2021 at 17:00 | Eventbrite

Thresholds, cascades, and wicked problems – Greenpeace International

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Thresholds, cascades, and wicked problems – Greenpeace International

Thresholds, cascades, and wicked problems

Rex Weyler 26 October 2020 | 0 CommentsShare on WhatsappShare on FacebookShare on TwitterShare via Email

I remember thinking, in the 1970s, that once people became aware of the ecological crisis — disappearing species, polluted rivers, poisoned air — that the necessary changes would be simple to achieve. Humanity only had to curb industrial waste and destruction, preserve wilderness for other species, put limits on our consumption, stabilize human population, and just be smart about how to live on Earth without destroying it. 

Of course, I was naive to think any of that would be easy. Since that time, human population has doubled, consumption of material resources has quadrupled, biodiversity collapse has accelerated, and after 34 international climate meetings, we are emitting more carbon than ever before. Meanwhile, we have not exactly ended war, vanquished racism, nor achieved gender or economic parity. Even worse, giant corporate interests actively work to halt and reverse any ecological regulation on industrial activity. 

Our emotional responses to crisis evolved over millennia, primarily to meet immediate needs, perhaps to benefit our tribe or community, not necessarily to solve complex, multi-dimensional, long-term dilemmas. Our ideas about “solutions” tend to be linear, short-term, and linked to a perception of simple cause and effect. Our educational institutions encourage this linear thinking about problems and solutions. Meanwhile, our social and ecological challenges are systemic, multidimensional, and complex. 

Living ecosystems are dynamic, always changing, and possess qualities such as thresholds, cascades, feedback loops, tipping points, lags, and generally unintended consequences to input. Maybe we need to learn more about how change actually occurs in nature, not just in our imaginations or in our engineering dissertations. 

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Thresholds, cascades, and wicked problems – Greenpeace International

The Network Effects Bible

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The Network Effects Bible

The Network Effects Bible

by James Currier & the NFX team

The Network Effects Bible

Network effects have been responsible for 70% of all the value created in technology since 1994. Founders who deeply understand how they work will be better positioned to build category-defining companies.

This reference for Founders will be continually updated and includes a comprehensive collection of terms and insights related to network effects all in one place. It’s one of three definitive resources we’ve written about network effects, also including:

  • The NFX Manual, which describes the 13 different types of network effects
  • The NFX Archives, a compendium of the most insightful articles ever written about network effects and network science

Roadmap

  1. Why Network Effects Are Important
  2. How Networks Work
  3. Properties of Networks
  4. Building and Maintaining Network Effects
  5. Related Concepts

View this presentation on Slideshare.

ebook and online book at source:

The Network Effects Bible

Green Paper — The System Innovation Initiative by ROCKWOOL Fonden

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Green Paper — The System Innovation Initiative by ROCKWOOL Fonden

Building Better Systems
A Green Paper on System Innovation 

Charles Leadbeater & Jennie Winhall, October 2020

In this first paper, innovation experts Charlie Leadbeater and Jennie Winhall set out a series of frameworks to help people take the first steps in creating the kinds of systems we need to meet shared, public challenges.

The paper is for all those who want to achieve greater social impact by acting on and investing in deliberate system change.

In it we cover how to assess the need for system innovation, and how to understand the way that innovations at different levels of a system, from the macro to the micro, come together to drive transition. We look at the role of purpose, power, relationships and resources in unlocking system change, and the cast of characters involved in making deliberate system change happen.

As a ‘green’ paper this is also an invitation to shape the questions this initiative should address going forward.

Building Better Systems - A Green Paper on System Innovation by Charlie Leadbeater and Jennie Winhall, October 2020.
Building Better Systems – A Green Paper on System Innovation by Charlie Leadbeater and Jennie Winhall, October 2020.

With thanks for their invaluable advice to the initiative from:

Dan Hill, Vinnova, Indy Johar, 0:0, Anna Randle, Collaborate, Dr Frances Westley, SIG, Dr Terry Irwin, Carneigie Mellon University, Cat Drew, UK Design Council, Alice Evans, Lankelly Chase, Anna Birney, School for Systems Change, Marc Ventresca, Saïd Business School, Christian Bason, Danish Design Centre, Cassie Robinson, TNLCF, Graham Leicester, Forum for the Future, Prof Frank Geels, The University of Manchester, Jayne Engle, McConnell Foundation, Giulio Quaggioto, UNDP, Jeremy Oppenheim, Systemiq.

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Green Paper — The System Innovation Initiative by ROCKWOOL Fonden

Generative Difference: A Philosophical Primer | by Dara Blumenthal, PhD | Nature of Work | Medium (2014)

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Generative Difference: A Philosophical Primer | by Dara Blumenthal, PhD | Nature of Work | Medium
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Young Diffraction Pattern

Generative Difference: A Philosophical Primer

Dara Blumenthal, PhD

Dara Blumenthal, PhD

Nov 16, 2014 

The basic relationship between what is alike and what is different is fundamental. We use this relationship to construct our identities, make choices, and understand who we are in an ever-changing world. Sameness/difference is a primary binary opposition that permeates and some would argue, structures our inner mental and experiential schemata. Crucially, in this relationship, sameness has been prioritized over difference for hundreds, if not thousands of years. Change is hard and slow. Consider how, in the contemporary West, we still live in a systemically racist society (where the fundamental frameworks of sameness derive from the straight white male ideal).

So what happens when we embrace difference, rather than trying to manage or empower it against the dominant norms of sameness?

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Generative Difference: A Philosophical Primer | by Dara Blumenthal, PhD | Nature of Work | Medium

Five insights for innovative systems change | Apolitical

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Five insights for innovative systems change | Apolitical

Five insights for innovative systems change

Deep rooted problems demand deep rooted solutions

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This article is written by Dan Jones, Associate, Social Finance


Covid-19 has exacerbated the challenges we face, but they are not new.

Many have deep and complex roots, and have resisted repeated attempts to address them. Public servants around the world are increasingly interested in systems change —  reorienting our whole approach to this kind of intractable problem, across the public and voluntary sectors, in order to tackle it at the roots.

More than 100,000 people in the UK are at high and imminent risk of being murdered or seriously harmed by a current or family partner or another family member. With no change in this number over the last 15 years, it is clear that the existing approach to domestic abuse is not working.

The Drive partnership has helped change the UK’s response to domestic abuse at a local and national level. We’ve developed new ways of working with perpetrators, to change their abusive behaviour, which are now being widely adopted.

We’ve influenced policy and funding streams, and reframed the narrative on domestic abuse —  from “Why doesn’t she leave?” to “Why doesn’t he stop?”.

Drive began with partners coming together around a problem they had already identified independently, and a shared ambition for system change

We want to share five insights from our recent report on Drive and systems change, for policymakers and practitioners trying to develop new, more effective responses to intractable social problems:

  • Start with a problem, and stay focused on solving it:
  • Show that change is possible
  • Link local and national
  • Get the relationships right
  • Tell as well as show

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Five insights for innovative systems change | Apolitical

Destruction of Information/The Performance Paradox:

Harish's Notebook - My notes... Lean, Cybernetics, Quality & Data Science.

Ross Ashby was one of the pioneers of Cybernetics. His 1956 book, An Introduction to Cybernetics, is still one of the best introductions to Cybernetics. As I was researching his journals, I came across an interesting phrase – “destruction of information.” Ashby noted:

I am not sure whether I have stated before my thesis – that the business of living things is the destruction of information.

Ashby gave several examples to explain what he meant by this. For example:

Consider a thermostat controlling a room’s temperature. If it is working well, we can get no idea, from the temperature of the room whether it is hot or cold outside. The thermostat’s job is to stop this information from reaching the occupant.

He also gave the example of an antiaircraft gun and its predictor. Suppose we observe only the error made by each shell in succession. If the predictor…

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Self-organisation and political systems | by Aidan Ward | GentlySerious | Nov, 2020 | Medium

Self-organisation and political systems Aidan Ward Following Nov 23 · 9 min read

Self-organisation and political systems | by Aidan Ward | GentlySerious | Nov, 2020 | Medium