Feminist system change practice: integrating power and love | by Tatiana Fraser | Refuge for systems leaders | Sep, 2021 | Medium

President’s Series 12 Cybernetics, Cognitive Science and Philosophy Tickets, Wed 13 Oct 2021 at 17:00 UK time

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President’s Series 12 Cybernetics, Cognitive Science and Philosophy Tickets, Wed 13 Oct 2021 at 17:00 | Eventbrite

OCT 13

President’s Series 12 Cybernetics, Cognitive Science and Philosophy

by Cybernetics Society — President’s Series

£0 – £20

Event Information

Joe Dewhurst explores cybernetics and cognitive science while Carl Sachs discusses Wilfred Sellars as Philosopher of Cybernetics

About this event

Hosted by our President, Dr. John Beckford FCybS, the CybSights President’s Series is a new programme that will bring interesting people together to explore the relevance and contribution of cybernetics to addressing important challenges.

Each event will consist of contributions by two different speakers. Each will be followed by individual Q&A. These are then brought together by the President in a lively and engaging plenary discussion. Each will seek areas of convergence and divergence between the ideas explored.

Events will be held via Zoom on the 2nd Wednesday of each month from 1700 to 1900.

Meetings are open to members of the Cybernetics Society and also the general public. Non-members are invited to join or give a donation. Booking is required.

The Cybernetics Society has been hosting conversations and lectures since the late 1960s.

Computers With Bodies: The Contemporary Impact of Cybernetic Approaches in Cognitive Science

The cybernetics movement included many key founding figures of what would eventually become known as cognitive science. Despite this connection, the cybernetic origins of cognitive science are often downplayed in accounts of the discipline’s history, and it is only relatively recently that cybernetic principles have come to be seen as once again relevant to contemporary cognitive science. This paper will consider the contemporary impact of cybernetics in two distinct streams of cognitive scientific research, namely computation and embodiment, and then explore some ways in which these two streams can fruitfully collaborate with one another.

Joe Dewhurst

Joe is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the Munich Center for Mathematical Philosophy, where he works on topics to do with computation, mechanistic explanation, and more recently formal approaches to causation and emergence in complex systems. His doctoral research at the University of Edinburgh looked at the relationship between common-sense intuitions and scientific theories in contemporary cognitive science, and he worked at Edinburgh as a Teaching Assistant before moving to Munich in 2018. In his spare time Joe designs and develops simulation boardgames, and is interested in parallels between scientific modelling and the use of boardgames to model real-world situations.

Wilfrid Sellars as Philosopher of Cybernetics

The American philosopher Wilfrid Sellars often uses examples of guided missiles or robots in his speculative scientific metaphysics of mind, but few have noticed that he is implicitly referring to cybernetics when he does so. I shall argue that Sellars’s use of cybernetic examples shows that he was probably familiar with cybernetic ideas from Wiener, Ashby, and Wisdom. In this light we can better understand why Sellars uses the kind of examples that he does. I will also argue that Sellars should have discovered second-order cybernetics and why he failed to do so.

Carl Sachs

Carl is currently associate professor of philosophy at Marymount University (USA), where he works on American pragmatism, the Frankfurt School of critical theory, and philosophy of mind. His first book, Intentionality and the Myths of the Given (Routledge 2014) integrated Sellars’s linguistic account of discursive intentionality with Merleau-Ponty’s phenomenology of embodied intentionality. He is currently writing a second book on Wilfrid Sellars as a philosopher at the intersection of German Idealism, American pragmatism, cybernetics, and philosophy of cognitive science. In his spare time he cooks, bakes, and exercises.

Plenary Discussion

The aim of this session, moderated by John Beckford, is to draw out the complementary and competing ideas emerging from the two sessions.

Dr. John Beckford, FCybS, President of the Cybernetics Society

John Beckford is a board member of WOSC, a partner in Beckford Consulting, Non-Executive Chair of the Board of Rise Mutual CIC, a Non-Executive Director of both Fusion21 and CoreHaus (social enterprises) and Visiting Professor in both the Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering at University College London and the Centre for Information Management, School of Business and Economics, Loughborough University. John holds a PhD in cybernetics from the University of Hull, is a Fellow of the Institution of Engineering and Technology and of the Royal Society for the Arts and a Member of the Institute of Management Services.

book at

President’s Series 12 Cybernetics, Cognitive Science and Philosophy Tickets, Wed 13 Oct 2021 at 17:00 | Eventbrite

The Cybernetics of the Two Wittgensteins:

Harish's Notebook - My notes... Lean, Cybernetics, Quality & Data Science.

In today’s post, I am looking at Wittgenstein and parallels between his ideas and Cybernetics. Wittgenstein is often regarded as one of the most influential philosophers of the twentieth century. His famous works include Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (referred to as TLP in this article) and Philosophical Investigations (referred to as PI in this article). TLP is one of the most intriguing books I have read and reread in philosophy. His style of writing is poetic and the body of the book is split into sections and sub-sections. Wittgenstein is one of the few philosophers who has written two influential books that held opposing views in linguistic philosophy.

The Early Wittgenstein:

Wittgenstein was very much influenced by Bertrand Russel’s logical representation of mathematics. Wittgenstein came to the conclusion that language also resides in a logical space. He realized that the problems in philosophy are due to a lack of understanding how language…

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W. Brian Arthur on Complexity Economics – Sean Carroll’s Mindscape podcast

Complexity Digest

Economies in the modern world are incredibly complex systems. But when we sit down to think about them in quantitative ways, it’s natural to keep things simple at first. We look for reliable relations between small numbers of variables, seek equilibrium configurations, and so forth. But those approaches don’t always work in complex systems, and sometimes we have to use methods that are specifically adapted to the challenges of complexity. That’s the perspective of W. Brian Arthur, a pioneer in the field of complexity economics, according to which economies are typically not in equilibrium, not made of homogeneous agents, and are being constantly updated. We talk about the basic ideas of complexity economics, how it differs from more standard approaches, and what it teaches us about the operation of real economies.

Listen at: www.preposterousuniverse.com

View original post

Late Great Engineers: Norbert Wiener – father of cybernetics | The Engineer The Engineer

Late Great Engineers: Norbert Wiener – father of cybernetics By The Engineer 15th September 2021 8:00 am

Late Great Engineers: Norbert Wiener – father of cybernetics | The Engineer The Engineer

The Complexity Evaluation Toolkit from CECAN

press release: New toolkit to help evaluate complex policies

Press Release from CECAN

toolkit:

Also:

their evluation framework for DEFRA:

Uvod u teoriju kompleksnosti | Meetup in Belgrade – Wed Sep 29, 17:55-19:25 CEST

Wednesday, September 29, 2021 Uvod u teoriju kompleksnosti Novi Milenkovic Hosted by Novi Milenkovic sensemaking.rs Public group ? Wednesday, September 29, 2021 5:55 PM to 7:25 PM CEST Add to calendar Impact Hub Belgrade Makedonska 21 · Beograd

Uvod u teoriju kompleksnosti | Meetup

Amara webinar: Transformation through inquiry – Amara Collaboration – the story of part of Bill Torbert’s developmental journey, 21 September 4-5pm CET

Amara webinar: Transformation through inquiry

Amara webinar: Transformation through inquiry – Amara Collaboration

Hear the inspiring story of Bill (William) Torbert – one of Amara’s founders – as he shares parts of his own developmental journey with us. A central theme in his development, and the transformations he has facilitated, is inquiry, especially the practice of Action Inquiry, which we use widely in our work in Amara. In the webinar we’ll discuss Action Inquiry personally with Bill, and learn practical ways of supporting transformation through inquiry. This free webinar takes place on Tuesday 21st of September at 4-5pm CET.Webinar in ZoomSeptember 21, 2021Free

The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It – Flyvbjerg (2021)

The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It Flyvbjerg, Bent and Dirk W. Bester, forthcoming, “The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It,” Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, accepted for publication. 25 Pages Posted: Bent Flyvbjerg University of Oxford – Said Business School Date Written: September 6, 2021

The Cost-Benefit Fallacy: Why Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Broken and How to Fix It by Bent Flyvbjerg :: SSRN

Ralph Stacey 10/9/1942 – 4/9/2021

Very sad to hear of the death of Ralph Stacey, here blogged most appropriately by Chris Mowles. I’m sure we will hear more tributes, remembrances, and reviews in the future.

Complexity & Management Centre

I am writing to let you know that I heard from Ralph Stacey’s family on Sunday that Ralph died peacefully in hospital on Saturday night after a short illness over the summer.

Many of you who follow this site may already know a lot about Ralph and will have met him in person. For those who didn’t know him, here is a brief obituary.

Ralph was trained as an economist graduating with his PhD from LSE in 1967. He came to Hatfield Polytechnic in 1985 having worked in corporate planning for the construction company John Laing, and having briefly been an investment analyst in the City of London. In the same year that the polytechnic became a university, 1992, Ralph was made a Professor of Management.

Ralph was one of the pioneers of adopting analogies from the sciences of complexity into theories exploring group dynamics in organisations. He published his…

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Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice – Sam Rye

Complexity•Sep 12, 2021

How can we work in organisations that don’t see complexxity, if we’re committed to embracing complexity in our practice?

Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice

Complexity•Sep 12, 2021

How can we work in organisations that don’t see complexxity, if we’re committed to embracing complexity in our practice?

Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice

1 new message

Fieldnote: Obscuring Complexity & Welcoming Trojan Mice

Complexity•Sep 12, 2021

How can we work in organisations that don’t see complexxity, if we’re committed to embracing complexity in our practice?

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management | Darya, Mar 20,2021

yes another one via Mikael Seppala

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management | Shortform Books

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management

Posted by darya | Mar 20, 2021Understanding Systems Thinking in Management

This article is an excerpt from the Shortform book guide to “Team of Teams” by Stanley McChrystal. Shortform has the world’s best summaries and analyses of books you should be reading.

Like this article? Sign up for a free trial here.

What is systems thinking? How does systems thinking apply to organizational management?

Systems thinking is a holistic approach to system analysis that focuses on examining the system as a whole by looking into how its constituent parts relate to one another. In systems thinking management, information is shared freely across the organization’s functions to facilitate collaboration.

Keep reading to learn about systems thinking in management.

continues in source

Understanding Systems Thinking in Management | Shortform Books

Horizon2020, Cities2030 (www.cities2030.eu); WP3 – Intelligence; Task 3.4 – Generate the project system thinking framework; D3.3 Systems Thinking Methodology

Horizon2020, Cities2030 (www.cities2030.eu); WP3 – Intelligence; Task 3.4 – Generate the project system thinking framework; D3.3 Systems Thinking Methodology

(PDF) Horizon2020, Cities2030 (www.cities2030.eu); WP3 – Intelligence; Task 3.4 – Generate the project system thinking framework; D3.3 Systems Thinking Methodology

UNDP Strategic Plan, 2022-2025

Mikael Seppala on the Systems Change Finland Slack says:

UNDP has systems at the forefront of their 2022-2025 strategy. cc @Arnaldo Pellini“UNDP works with countries to expand people’s choices for a fairer, sustainable future, to build the world envisioned by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development with planet and people in balance. The challenge of the next four years is to accelerate and scale up development results significantly, bringing the Goals back within reach. Towards that end, UNDP will support change in three directions:• Structural transformation, particularly green, inclusive and digital transitions;
• Leaving no one behind, a rights-based approach centred on human agency and human development;
• Building resilience to respond to systemic uncertainty and risk.These are huge, whole-of-society puzzles that require collective efforts and integrated approaches. UNDP offers a unique network of global reach and local presence, sectoral expertise and trusted partnerships to help solve these puzzles. In the next four years, UNDP will work with countries to expand human capabilities through which 100 million people can escape multidimensional poverty; support access to clean energy for 500 million people; support 800 million people to participate in elections, many for the first time; and promote the investment of over $1 trillion of public expenditure and private capital in the Sustainable Development Goals.Powerful enablers – strategic innovation, digitalization and development finance – will further accelerate and scale results. To be an effective partner in transformative change, UNDP has to build not just new skills, like systems thinking, but a new culture: one that embraces complexity, actively manages risk, continually adapts and seeks to learn alongside delivering results. In an uncertain world, its business model must empower UNDP to respond to partners with the flexibility and at the scale they expect.”

https://undocs.org/DP/2021/28

Linnaeus University Systems Community (LNU-STC) | lnu.se

Linnaeus University Systems Community (LNU-STC)

Linnaeus University Systems Community (LNU-STC) | lnu.se