CST WEBINAR SERIES A roadmap to redefine humanity’s relationship with the ocean – Thursday, August 20, 2020, 13:00—14:00 (GMT+2)

CST WEBINAR SERIES
A roadmap to redefine humanity’s relationship
with the ocean  Thursday, August 20th from 13:00—14:00 (GMT+2)
This webinar will take place online
Register in advance for this
https://maties.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8SWHErYuQGeHl82hdYLaCQJoin us for a discussion in our CST series of Webinars

A roadmap to redefine humanity’s relationship with the ocean 
This series brings together scientists, practitioners and societal actors who use the frameworks of complexity and resilience thinking in their daily work to make sense of the complex dynamics of change and transformative processes. There will be a special focus on how these ideas and practices are used in current times and how local and regional processes and perspectives are being shaped by applying the theoretical concepts and tools for fostering more resilient organisations, communities and decision-making strategies. 

Mark Swilling and Tanya Brodie Rudolph from the CST and Philile Mbatha from UCT worked in collaboration with researchers from the Natural Capital Project, Stanford University, the Stockholm Resilience Centre, the University of Washington and World Fish, as well as the Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile to create a Blue Paper for the High Level Panel for the Ocean on a transition to a sustainable ocean economy. These findings were also published a month later in a perspective piece in Nature Communications. The three local authors will take attendees through their key findings, sketching a road map to redefine the relationship between humanity and the ocean. More information is available hereDiscussants: Prof Mark Swilling, Tanya Brodie Rudolph, Dr Philile Mbatha
Moderator: Dr Rika Preiser Register in advance for this webinar:
https://maties.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_8SWHErYuQGeHl82hdYLaCQ Prof Mark Swilling is Co-Director of the Stellenbosch Centre for Complex Systems in Transition, Programme Coordinator of the Sustainable Development Programme in the School of Public Leadership and the Academic Director of the Sustainability Institute.The primary research focus of his career can be defined as ‘societal transitions’ within the wider discipline of sustainability science and governance, with a particular contextual focus on urban sustainability. He has published over 60 academic articles/book chapters and several books including (with Eve Annecke) Just Transitions: Explorations of Sustainability in an Unfair World (2012) – runner-up Harold and Margaret Sprout Award for best environmental governance book; Untamed Urbanisms (2015); Greening the South African Economy (2016). HIs latest book  Age of Sustainability: Just Transitions in a Complex World (Routledge 2019) is his most significant academic output. Tanya Brodie Rudolph is an expert in marine and environmental law, with over twenty years of experience. As part of her commercial legal practise, she participated as commercial lead of a team of experts in the development and implementation of multi-million dollar infrastructure investments in the oil and gas sector in South Africa. Tanya has a Master’s degree in financial market law, as well as a Masters in Marine and Environmental Law. She currently runs a trans-disciplinary legal, design and science consultancy to investigate, guide and solve for sustainability solutions. Tanya is a research fellow at the Centre for Complex Systems in Transition. Her research focuses on understanding how societal, ecological and normative transformations fit within existing regulatory frameworks, and the evolution required in legal frameworks in order to advance and support systemic change. Tanya has a keen interest in engaging across disciplines nationally and globally in the development of this research area. Dr. Philile Mbatha is a lecturer in the Environmental and Geographical Science Department at the University of Cape Town. Her research and teaching are within the fields of environmental sustainability and human geography, with a specific focus on coastal resource governance and coastal livelihoods. Philile has over 10 years’ experience conducting research on marine and coastal governance and livelihoods related topics in the Western Indian Ocean region of southern Africa, with a specific focus on rural contexts along the coast. Philile is interested in conducting research that can contribute to rural development by linking policy-making platforms and institutional arrangements that manage coastal resources to the people on the ground and their livelihood realities. Philile is also passionate about conducting research on topics that involve fisheries, mining, tourism, as well as broader conservation of coastal resources; exploring different issues including livelihoods, legal pluralism, access, politics, power dynamics, distribution of benefits from resources and plural governance. 
Ideas for the colloquia? Contact hayleyclements@sun.ac.za & joywaddell@sun.ac.za

The double-consciousness of the stigmatised – Professor Imogen Tyler, and Barry Oshry: Can the Dominant Culture Truly See the Other?

Barry Oshry has just reissued his piece ‘can we truly see the Other’ as ‘Can the Dominant Culture Truly See the Other?’ and says:

My original title for this piece was: Can We Truly See the Other? Recently, it struck me that I needed to be clear about who the WE is that I’m addressing. This is not a message primarily aimed at people of color, although there is likely to be much of interest in it for them.  The intended audience is the White dominant culture. There are powerful forces aimed at bringing about fundamental societal transformations in policing, housing, healthcare, employment, education, governance, and more. The pressure is on the dominant culture, and fundamental to the dominants’ response to these challenges is how we (I’m one of them) see the other. Throughout our history and continuing today certain images and perceptions of the other have supported discrimination and oppression. How do such images arise and how can they be changed? Both questions are the subject of this piece.

This seems to me to link to this piece:

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The double-consciousness of the stigmatised – Professor Imogen Tyler

IMOGEN TYLER

The double-consciousness of the stigmatised

A short slightly adapted extract from chapter 5 of Stigma

 Sociological Imagination

In The Sociological Imagination (1959), the American sociologist Charles Wright Mills famously stated that ‘no social study that does not come back to the problem of biography, of history and their intersections within a society has completed its intellectual journey’.[i]  Indeed, the promise of sociology is the critical sensibility which it cultivates when we tease out ‘the public issue or problem contained in the private trouble’.[ii] This forging of connections between the personal and the political, between individual biographies and the histories that shape them, is particularly urgent today.  As the sociologists Nicholas Gane and Les Back argue, ‘in a neoliberal world which seeks to tear asunder private troubles from public issues, and thereby turn social uncertainty into a personal failure that is divorced from any collective cause or remedy, the linking of biography and history is a vital part of a sociology that is both politically and publicly engaged.’[iii]

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The double-consciousness of the stigmatised – Professor Imogen Tyler

We Can’t Include Everything and Everyone. So, what to do? On Boundaries – Evaluation Uncertainty

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We Can’t Include Everything and Everyone. So, what to do? On Boundaries – Evaluation Uncertainty

We Can’t Include Everything and Everyone. So, what to do? On Boundaries

Emily Gates
Assistant Professor, Boston College
emily.gates@bc.edu

I am an evaluator who also teaches evaluation courses and conducts research on evaluation. In my work, I draw on the ideas of boundaries and boundary critique from critical systems thinking. These ideas have deep philosophical roots and the potential to alter or affirm the way you see the world, and act and interact within it. They are fundamental to what ‘system’ and a ‘systems approach’ mean. In the limited space here, I share five points about boundaries.

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We Can’t Include Everything and Everyone. So, what to do? On Boundaries – Evaluation Uncertainty

Improvisation Blog: The Exams Crisis: The Establishment Crumbles from Society’s Children Upwards

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Improvisation Blog: The Exams Crisis: The Establishment Crumbles from Society’s Children Upwards

Wednesday, 12 August 2020

The Exams Crisis: The Establishment Crumbles from Society’s Children Upwards

Coronavirus is exposing the poverty of understanding of what really matters in society. If education  has been seen to be a priority at all, it is because the function of school in “keeping the kids off the streets” has been prioritised (behind lots of bluster about “learning”). 

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Improvisation Blog: The Exams Crisis: The Establishment Crumbles from Society’s Children Upwards

1969, 1981 Emery, System Thinking: Selected Readings

In brief. David Ing.

Graduate students in Social Systems Science at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania (graduating 1975-1988) — the program led by Russell Ackoff — were guided to read a Penguin paperback collection of articles. Across multiple editions, the content changed. Long out of print, the earliest editions are difficult to find.

From the Internet Archive, we can resurrect an entry (circa 2007) on the Collection and Resources section of the Systems Sciences Connections Conversation. This annotated list of tables of contents and excerpts from each edition “Introduction” may be helpful to readers who want a sense of the articles that might otherwise be accessible as journal articles.


There are multiple editions of this book. It’s a bit confusing that the 1969 version was first published as a single volume, and the 1981 version seems to have added a second volume. We should get the table of contents for…

View original post 2,091 more words

Unlocking systems transformation – A business view – Business Fights Poverty

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Unlocking systems transformation – A business view – Business Fights Poverty

Unlocking systems transformation – A business view

The term “systems transformation” is increasingly being used to describe what is needed to achieve sustainable development. Players across government, industry, academia and civil society are more and more aligned in their position that the sustainable development challenges we face are complex, highly interconnected and systemic, and that incremental change will not be enough to achieve a truly sustainable future.Share this story   

Filippo Veglio, Managing Director, People Program & Outreach, WBCSD

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Wednesday July 1 2020

The term “systems transformation” is increasingly being used to describe what is needed to achieve sustainable development. Players across government, industry, academia and civil society are more and more aligned in their position that the sustainable development challenges we face are complex, highly interconnected and systemic, and that incremental change will not be enough to achieve a truly sustainable future.

However, despite the continued popularization of the concept of systems transformation, this term is often interpreted differently and applied with varying levels of ambition. To give us the best possible chance of securing genuine change and ensuring that systemic risks and vulnerabilities do not continue to accumulate, it is vital that we develop a clear and collective understanding of what systems transformation actually involves, how it happens and the levers that different actors, including the private sector, can pull to accelerate the lasting change that is urgently required.

new issue brief released by the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD)  sets out to answer these questions. Drawing on a broad literature review and a series of expert interviews, it lays out a common theory and vocabulary for business that will support the uncommon task of driving the transformation of key economic systems in the critical years ahead.

This piece of work is an interim output from WBCSD’s current refresh of its Vision 2050, a landmark 2010 report that laid out a pathway to a world in which nine billion people are able to live well, within planetary boundaries, by mid-century. WBCSD is working together with 40 of its member companies to update this work and again provide business with a common agenda for action over the decade to come. Among the resources that have already been produced are an analysis of Macrotrends & Disruptions shaping 2020-2030, and a piece of work looking at The consequences of COVID-19 for the decade ahead.

In the coming months the Council will release further thought pieces, supporting companies as they navigate the challenges of responding to the socio-economic turmoil unleashed by COVID-19, all the while maintaining (and increasing) ambition on realizing sustainable development.

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Unlocking systems transformation – A business view – Business Fights Poverty

Affordance – Wikipedia

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Affordance – Wikipedia

Affordance

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to navigationJump to search“Afford” redirects here. For other meanings, see Afford (disambiguation).

Affordance is what the environment offers the individual. James J. Gibson coined the term in his 1966 book, The Senses Considered as Perceptual Systems,[1] and it occurs in many of his earlier essays (e.g.[2]). However, his best-known definition is taken from his seminal 1979 book, The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception:

The affordances of the environment are what it offers the animal, what it provides or furnishes, either for good or ill. The verb to afford is found in the dictionary, the noun affordance is not. I have made it up. I mean by it something that refers to both the environment and the animal in a way that no existing term does. It implies the complementarity of the animal and the environment.— Gibson (1979, p. 127)[3]

The word is used in a variety of fields: perceptual psychologycognitive psychologyenvironmental psychologyindustrial designhuman–computer interaction (HCI), interaction designuser-centered designcommunication studiesinstructional designscience, technology and society (STS), sports science and artificial intelligence.

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Affordance – Wikipedia

Also:

James J. Gibson From: the Ecological Approach to Visual Perception Chapter 8 the Theory of Affordances

James Jerry GibsonPublished 2013I have described the environment as the surfaces that separate substances from the medium in which the animals live. But I have also described what the environment affords animals, mentioning the terrain, shelters, water, fire, objects, tools, other animals, and human displays. How do we go from surfaces to affordances? And if there is information in light for the perception of surfaces, is there information for the perception of what they afford? Perhaps the composition and layout of surfaces constitute what they afford. If so, to perceive them is to perceive what they afford. This is a radical hypothesis, for it implies that the “values” and “meanings” of things in the environment can be directly perceived. Moreover, it would explain the sense in which values and meanings are external to the perceiver.

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/James-J.-Gibson-From%3A-the-Ecological-Approach-to-8-Gibson/eab2b1523b942ca7ae44e7495c496bc87628f9e1

The Theory of Affordances – http://scholar.google.co.uk/scholar_url?url=https://cs.brown.edu/courses/cs137/readings/Gibson-AFF.pdf&hl=en&sa=X&scisig=AAGBfm1u77-ND8s2osd8bXUebAuYO48WOg&nossl=1&oi=scholarr

The Perception of the Visual World http://s-f-walker.org.uk/pubsebooks/pdfs/The%20Perception%20of%20the%20Visual%20World-GibsonJJ.pdf

Improvisation Blog: Alternative Natural Philosophy Association Online (ANPA41 web conference – running now to 4 September 2020)

Mark Johnson’s blog entry:

Improvisation Blog: Alternative Natural Philosophy Association Online

Read the blog entry for fascinating history and connections, link below to event page:

ANPA 41 Web Conference Details (August 2020)

Monday 10th August – Friday 4th September

Daily Presentation at 17:00 UK;  16:00 Zurich; 10:30 CDT;  11:30 EST;  9:30 MDT

(Opening on Mon. 10th  30 minutes earlier)

Zoom link was emailed to you our simply type into your browser:  iow.li/anpa

event page: http://anpa.onl/2020/anpa-41-web-conference-details-august-2020/

Mark Johnson’s blog entry: Alternative Natural Philosophy Association Online

Improvisation Blog: Alternative Natural Philosophy Association Online

Schema Mapping – Thinking Can Triumph over B****** on Twitter: “Dear ‘systems thinkers’ ‘change agents’ & anyone interested in recalibrating; life, fulfilment, stimulation, the economy, the planet – for a post covid world. Here are the two most influential systems thinking documents ever written (1977). https://t.co/BlR2gaRL03 https://t.co/OuIdX92dBb” / Twitter

“It was called the ‘wiring diagram’. John Hoskyns – who had one of he first systems houses – prepared it as an analysis of why it was so hard to do business in the UK at the time, and what to do about it. It was adopted by the Tories and became the Thatcher revolution.”

View of Heteromation and its (dis)contents: The invisible division of labor between humans and machines – Ekbia and Nardi

Like a dystopian class warfare version of Taiichi Ohno’s Autonomation

Abstract
The division of labor between humans and computer systems has changed along both technical and human dimensions. Technically, there has been a shift from technologies of automation, the aim of which was to disallow human intervention at nearly all points in the system, to technologies of “heteromation” that push critical tasks to end users as indispensable mediators. As this has happened, the large population of human beings who have been driven out by the first type of technology are drawn back into the computational fold by the second type. Turning artificial intelligence on its head, one technology fills the gap created by the other, but with a vengeance that unsettles established mechanisms of reward, fulfillment, and compensation. In this fashion, replacement of human beings and their irrelevance to technological systems has given way to new “modes of engagement” with remarkable social, economic, and ethical implications. In this paper we provide a historical backdrop for heteromation and explore and explicate some of these displacements through analysis of a number of cases, including Mechanical Turk, the video games FoldIt and League of Legends, and social media.

The Part Played by Labor in the Transition From Ape to Man – Engels (1876)

‘we shape our tools – and, afterwards, our tools shape us’

certainly not the most reliable guide to evolution, but very interesting

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The Part Played by Labor in the Transition From Ape to Man

Works of Frederick Engels 1876

monkey playing

The Part played by Labour in the Transition from Ape to Man


Written: in May-June 1876;
First published: in Die Neue Zeit 1895-06;
Translated: from the German by Clemens Dutt;
First published in English: by Progress Publishers, Moscow, 1934;
Transcribed: by director@marx.org, Jan 1996.


This article was intended to introduce a larger work which Engels planned to call Die drei Grundformen der Knechtschaft – Outline of the General Plan. Engels never finished it, nor even this intro, which breaks off at the end. It would be included in Dialectics of Nature.

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The Part Played by Labor in the Transition From Ape to Man

Cybernetic Big Five Theory – DeYoung (2015)

so – the link between Jordan Peterson and Stafford Beer, including the Enneagram?

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[PDF] Cybernetic Big Five Theory. | Semantic Scholar

Cybernetic Big Five Theory

Journal of Research in Personality, 56, 33-58 – June 2015
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jrp.2014.07.004

Authors

  1. Colin G. DeYoung – University of Minnesota

Abstract

Cybernetics, the study of goal-directed, adaptive systems, is the best framework for an integrative theory of personality. Cybernetic Big Five Theory attempts to provide a comprehensive, synthetic, and mechanistic explanatory model. Constructs that describe psychological individual differences are divided into personality traits, reflecting variation in the parameters of evolved cybernetic mechanisms, and characteristic adaptations, representing goals, interpretations, and strategies defined in relation to an individual’s particular life circumstances. The theory identifies mechanisms in which variation is responsible for traits in the top three levels of a hierarchical trait taxonomy based on the Big Five and describes the causal dynamics between traits and characteristic adaptations. Lastly, the theory links function and dysfunction in traits and characteristic adaptations to psychopathology and well-being.Less

Acknowledgements

I thank Jordan Peterson for introducing me to many of the ideas synthesized by CB5T and for developing a theory capable of explaining human activities from the most trivial to the most abstract (Peterson, 1999). Thanks to Valerie Tiberius for conversations about virtues and values; to Bob Krueger for thoughts on clinical relevance; to Jacob Hirsh for testing the limits of my distinction between traits and characteristic adaptations; and to Steve DeYoung and Alex Rautu for comments on an earlier version of the manuscript.

Cybernetic Big Five Theory.

[PDF] Cybernetic Big Five Theory. | Semantic Scholar

Illuminating Michael Lissack’s “Understanding Is a Design Problem: Cognizing from a Designerly Thinking Perspective” Using the Process Enneagram – ScienceDirect

Commentary: Illuminating Michael Lissack’s “Understanding Is a Design Problem: Cognizing from a Designerly Thinking Perspective” Using the Process Enneagram – Knowles (2019)

Richard N.Knowles

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Illuminating Michael Lissack’s “Understanding Is a Design Problem: Cognizing from a Designerly Thinking Perspective” Using the Process Enneagram – ScienceDirect

She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation

Volume 5, Issue 4, Winter 2019, Pages 386-390

She Ji: The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation

Commentary: Illuminating Michael Lissack’s “Understanding Is a Design Problem: Cognizing from a Designerly Thinking Perspective” Using the Process Enneagram

Richard N.Knowles

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Illuminating Michael Lissack’s “Understanding Is a Design Problem: Cognizing from a Designerly Thinking Perspective” Using the Process Enneagram – ScienceDirect

Using Enterprise Models to Explain and Discuss Autopoiesis and Homeostasis in Socio-technical Systems | Bider et al (202) | Complex Systems Informatics and Modeling Quarterly

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Using Enterprise Models to Explain and Discuss Autopoiesis and Homeostasis in Socio-technical Systems | Bider | Complex Systems Informatics and Modeling Quarterly

Using Enterprise Models to Explain and Discuss Autopoiesis and Homeostasis in Socio-technical Systems

Ilia Bider, Gil Regev, Erik Perjons

Abstract

The article links two seemingly different fundamental theoretical concepts of autopoiesis and homeostasis and tries to apply them to the realm of socio-technical systems with the use of the Fractal Enterprise Model (FEM). Autopoiesis is the property of a system that constantly reproduces itself. Homeostasis describes a way a complex system constantly maintains its identity while adapting to changes in its internal and external environment. To be able to use FEM for this task, the original version of FEM has been extended by adding special elements for representing the system’s context – part of the environment to which the system is structurally coupled. The approach taken in this article differs from other works in the same field in having the focus on the “body” (concrete elements being reproduced) of the socio-technical system, as well as on identifying concrete processes that reproduce the system, and demonstrating concrete ways of how a specific system adapts or can adapt to the perturbations in the environment (i.e. internal and external disturbances that affect the system).

Keywords:Socio-technical; Autopoiesis; Homeostasis; Structural Coupling; Fractal Enterprise Model
Full Text:PDF

DOI: 10.7250/csimq.2020-22.02

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Using Enterprise Models to Explain and Discuss Autopoiesis and Homeostasis in Socio-technical Systems | Bider | Complex Systems Informatics and Modeling Quarterly

The science of the unknowable: Stafford Beer’s cybernetic informatics – Pickering (2004)

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[PDF] The science of the unknowable: Stafford Beer’s cybernetic informatics | Semantic Scholar

The science of the unknowable: Stafford Beer’s cybernetic informatics

Andrew Pickering

Published 2004

Kybernetes

This paper explores the history of Stafford Beer’s work in management cybernetics, from his early conception and simulation of an adaptive automatic factory and associated experimentation in biological computing, through the development of the Viable System Model and the Team Syntegrity technique for discussion and planning. It also pursues Beer into the fields of micro‐ and macropolitics and spirituality. The aim is to show that all of Beer’s projects can be understood as specific instantiations and workings out of a cybernetic ontology of unknowability and becoming: a stance that recognises that the world can always surprise us and that we can never dominate it through knowledge. The thrust of Beer’s work was, thus, to construct systems that could adapt performatively to environments they could not fully control.

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[PDF] The science of the unknowable: Stafford Beer’s cybernetic informatics | Semantic Scholar