A General Theory of Living Systems | James Grier Miller – Coevolving Innovations

A General Theory of Living Systems | James Grier Miller August 2, 2022 daviding

A General Theory of Living Systems | James Grier Miller – Coevolving Innovations

Cybernetic Leadership – Exploring skills for leading change in a disrupted, tech-enabled world (white paper)| ANU School of Cybernetics

Cybernetic LeadershipExploring skills for leading change in a disrupted, tech-enabled world

Cybernetic Leadership | ANU School of Cybernetics

Controlling Complexity: From Nonlinear Systems To Complex Networks And Beyond. Ischia, Italy. September 9 – 10, 2022

Complexity Digest

The International Workshop Controlling Complexity aims at bringing together researchers from the fields of nonlinear systems and control, optimization, and complex networks to celebrate the 70th birthday of Franco Garofalo who started the research group on nonlinear systems and complex networks at the University of Naples Federico II with a group of students and colleagues who are now established researchers in Italy and abroad. The workshop will gather scholars from the Control Community to share their views and perspectives on the emerging challenges in the analysis, design and control of complex systems. We welcome the participation of young researchers and PhD students.

Read the full article at: www.sicc-it.org

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The Art of Systems Change: Eight Guiding Principles for a Green and Fair Future | Publications | WWF

The Art of Systems Change: Eight Guiding Principles for a Green and Fair FutureDATE:November 01, 2019The Fuller Systems Transformation Collaborative

The Art of Systems Change: Eight Guiding Principles for a Green and Fair Future | Publications | WWF

Systems Thinking: A Foxy Approach – Venkatesh Rao (2013)

Systems Thinking: A Foxy Approach

Systems Thinking: A Foxy Approach

BBC – Radio 4 – The Reith Lectures Transcripts 1948-1959 – 1950 – John Zachary Young: Doubt and Certainty in Science

https://www.bbc.co.uk/radio4/features/the-reith-lectures/transcripts/1948/#y1950


Reith 1950 – John Zachary Young: Doubt and Certainty in Science

On LinkedIn (https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6958549227190857729/), Dennis Sandow says:

In the 1950’s Humberto Maturana became a student of JZ Young.

In this first Reith lecture JZ discusses the scientific process of muddling through as opposed to the philosophic process found in logic.

https://lnkd.in/gejihrEG

From Cybernetics to Second-Order Cybernetics: A Comparative Analysis of Their Central Ideas | Froese (2010)

From Cybernetics to Second-Order Cybernetics: A Comparative Analysis of Their Central Ideas

(99+) From Cybernetics to Second-Order Cybernetics: A Comparative Analysis of Their Central Ideas | Tom Froese – Academia.edu

CONSTRUCTING A REALITY

LEBBEUS WOODS

Following on Neil Spiller’s reference to radical Constructivism, I thought it important to re-post (ZEROES AND ONES, November, 2008, in a more readable form) one of its seminal texts by Heinz von Foerster, the founder of second-order cybernetics and a leading radical Constructivist.

A personal note. I had the great good fortune to meet Heinz when I was twenty-one years old and a student of architecture at the University of Illinois, where he headed the Biological Computer Laboratory, a major cybernetics think-tank. In the 60s we had a working relationship, as he asked me to make illustrations for several of his scientific papers, which meant that he had to explain to me his ideas, which he did with remarkable simplicity and clarity. I learned a lot in our conversations, and it has echoed down through the years in my work. Heinz always called me an “epistemologist,’ a high…

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SFI Community Lecture: The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World – Andrea Wulf, 2 August 2022, 7:30pm Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA – in person, live stream but no recording

SFI Community Lecture

The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World

Andrea Wulf Santa Fe Institute Miller Scholar

Tuesday, August 2, 2022 Book Signing: 6:30 pm Lecture: 7:30 pm

The Lensic Performing Arts Center211 W. San Francisco StreetSanta Fe, New Mexico

link

Also streaming live – but, sadly, ‘on request of the speaker’ the recording will not be available.

https://santafe.edu/events/invention-nature-alexander-von-humboldts-new-world

SFI Community LectureThe Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World
Andrea Wulf
Santa Fe Institute Miller Scholar

Tuesday, August 2, 2022
 Book Signing: 6:30 pm
Lecture: 7:30 pm
The Lensic Performing Arts Center
211 W. San Francisco Street
Santa Fe, New Mexico

Image credit: © Andrea Wulf and Lillian Melcher
Award winning and bestselling author Andrea Wulf tells the story of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), the great scientist and intrepid explorer who has more things named after him than anyone else. His restless life was packed with adventure and discovery, whether exploring deep into the rainforest or climbing the world’s highest volcanoes. He turned scientific observation into poetic narrative, and his writings inspired naturalists and poets such as Darwin and Goethe but also politicians such as Jefferson and Bolivar.

Humboldt explained nature as a complex web of life and interconnected global force – a concept that still shapes our thinking today. He described earth as a living organism that could easily be destroyed by humankind and predicted harmful human–induced climate change already in 1800. Using many dozens of Humboldt’s own drawings, engravings, maps and manuscripts as well as the lush and colourful pages from her illustrated book, The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt, Wulf brings this forgotten father of environmentalism (and complexity science?) back to life.

Andrea is a Santa Fe Institute Miller Scholar twice over.

Andrea will be signing copies of her books in the Lensic lobby prior to the lecture.

Reserve your free tickets through The Lensic Box Office online or call (505) 988.1234. Santa Fe residents are encouraged to attend in person. Please refer to the Lensic’s current COVID safety protocols before attending. For those unable to attend, we will be streaming this lecture live from TwitterFacebookLinkedIn and our YouTube page.

This lecture is presented at no cost to the public thanks to the generous sponsorship from the McKinnon Family Foundation, with additional support provided by The Lensic Performing Arts Center and the Santa Fe Reporter.Click here for more information about SFI’s Community Lecture Series.

Metaverse as cybernetic system | Projects – ANU School of Cybernetics

Metaverse as cybernetic systemLearning from prior socio-technical systems to better inform design

Metaverse as cybernetic system | ANU School of Cybernetics

Essentially contested concept – Wikipedia

Essentially contested concept

Essentially contested concept – Wikipedia

[This was an important ‘threshold concept’ to me (see https://stream.syscoi.com/2019/12/03/the-threshold-concept-an-introduction-and-overview-to-the-concept/ and https://www.linkedin.com/posts/antlerboy_thinking-change-transformation-activity-6788358013733371904-tza5/) and is a very important idea for systems | complexity | cybernetics as a science, theory, and practice (or sets of same)]

Essentially contested concept

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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In a paper delivered to the Aristotelian Society on 12 March 1956,[1] Walter Bryce Gallie (1912–1998) introduced the term essentially contested concept to facilitate an understanding of the different applications or interpretations of the sorts of abstract, qualitative, and evaluative notions[2]—such as “art“, “philanthropy“,[3] “power”[4] and “social justice“—used in the domains of aestheticssustainable developmentpolitical philosophyphilosophy of history, and philosophy of religion.

Garver (1978) describes their use as follows:

The term essentially contested concepts gives a name to a problematic situation that many people recognize: that in certain kinds of talk there is a variety of meanings employed for key terms in an argument, and there is a feeling that dogmatism (“My answer is right and all others are wrong”), skepticism (“All answers are equally true (or false); everyone has a right to his own truth”), and eclecticism (“Each meaning gives a partial view so the more meanings the better”) are none of them the appropriate attitude towards that variety of meanings.[5]

Essentially contested concepts involve widespread agreement on a concept (e.g., “fairness”), but not on the best realization thereof.[6] They are “concepts the proper use of which inevitably involves endless disputes about their proper uses on the part of their users”,[7] and these disputes “cannot be settled by appeal to empirical evidence, linguistic usage, or the canons of logic alone”.[8]

When Unfreeze-Move-Refreeze Isn’t Working: Doing, Thinking and Making via Systems Changes Learning | SCiO 2022-07-11 – Coevolving Innovations

When Unfreeze-Move-Refreeze Isn’t Working: Doing, Thinking and Making via Systems Changes Learning | SCiO 2022-07-11

When Unfreeze-Move-Refreeze Isn’t Working: Doing, Thinking and Making via Systems Changes Learning | SCiO 2022-07-11 – Coevolving Innovations

Appreciating Systems Changes via Multiparadigm Inquiry: Architectural Design, Ecological Anthropology, Classical Chinese Medicine, Systems Rhythms | ISSS plenary 2022-07-08 – Coevolving Innovations – David Ing

Appreciating Systems Changes via Multiparadigm Inquiry: Architectural Design, Ecological Anthropology, Classical Chinese Medicine, Systems Rhythms | ISSS plenary 2022-07-08

Appreciating Systems Changes via Multiparadigm Inquiry: Architectural Design, Ecological Anthropology, Classical Chinese Medicine, Systems Rhythms | ISSS plenary 2022-07-08 – Coevolving Innovations

Waddington’s canalization revisited: Developmental stability and evolution | Siegal and Bergman (2002)

Waddington’s canalization revisited: Developmental stability and evolutionMark L. Siegal and Aviv BergmanAuthors Info & AffiliationsJune 24, 200299 (16) 10528-10532https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.102303999

Waddington’s canalization revisited: Developmental stability and evolution | PNAS

Canalisation (genetics) on wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canalisation_(genetics)

Aviv Bergman on The Evolution of Robustness and Integrating The Disciplines | COMPLEXITY podcast from the Santa Fe Institute, hosted by Michael Garfield

Aviv Bergman on The Evolution of Robustness and Integrating The Disciplines | COMPLEXITY

All in all, one of the richest single episodes of a podcast I’ve ever heard – coherent and fascinating in itself, whole careers and PhDs could develop from many aspects of the conversation…

Aviv Bergman on The Evolution of Robustness and Integrating The DisciplinesJULY 18TH, 2022 | 01:14:58 | E88

Aviv Bergman on The Evolution of Robustness and Integrating The Disciplines | COMPLEXITY