Identity Management in an Institution of Higher Education: A Case Study Using Structural Coupling and Fractal Enterprise Model | Bider and Perjons (2021)

Identity Management in an Institution of Higher Education: A Case Study Using Structural Coupling and Fractal Enterprise Model

Identity Management in an Institution of Higher Education: A Case Study Using Structural Coupling and Fractal Enterprise Model | Bider | Complex Systems Informatics and Modeling Quarterly

Boundary critique and its implications for conflict prevention | Midgley and Pinzon (20110)

pdf

[PDF] Boundary critique and its implications for conflict prevention | Semantic Scholar

Boundary critique and its implications for conflict prevention

This paper reviews developments in the theory of boundary critique, which has been used in a number of OR projects to support conflict resolution. The authors argue that this theory (and associated models) is also useful for conflict prevention. It indicates the need to support people in discussing their differences before conflict arises. Potential conflicts can be reframed through dialogue focusing on values, and participative governance can institutionalise fair processes for making decisions in the absence of consensus. Some of the boundary critique models also support people in recognising and countering the systemic conditions that enable stereotyping, stigmatisation and the victimisation of minorities. The paper ends by presenting a new model that was originally developed to inform mediation practice, but also has implications for conflict prevention. This helps explain how different interpretations of a common concern arise, and suggests ways to improve mutual understanding between people and/or reframe the common concern in order to defuse a potential conflict. 

View on Taylor & Francis

pdf at researchgate.net

more in source including pdf link:

[PDF] Boundary critique and its implications for conflict prevention | Semantic Scholar

Expertise in research integration and implementation for tackling complex problems: when is it needed, where can it be found and how can it be strengthened? | Bammer et al (2020)

source:

Expertise in research integration and implementation for tackling complex problems: when is it needed, where can it be found and how can it be strengthened? | Humanities and Social Sciences Communications

Expertise in research integration and implementation for tackling complex problems: when is it needed, where can it be found and how can it be strengthened?

Palgrave Communications volume 6, Article number: 5 (2020) Cite this article

Abstract

Expertise in research integration and implementation is an essential but often overlooked component of tackling complex societal and environmental problems. We focus on expertise relevant to any complex problem, especially contributory expertise, divided into ‘knowing-that’ and ‘knowing-how.’ We also deal with interactional expertise and the fact that much expertise is tacit. We explore three questions. First, in examining ‘when is expertise in research integration and implementation required?,’ we review tasks essential (a) to developing more comprehensive understandings of complex problems, plus possible ways to address them, and (b) for supporting implementation of those understandings into government policy, community practice, business and social innovation, or other initiatives. Second, in considering ‘where can expertise in research integration and implementation currently be found?,’ we describe three realms: (a) specific approaches, including interdisciplinarity, transdisciplinarity, systems thinking and sustainability science; (b) case-based experience that is independent of these specific approaches; and (c) research examining elements of integration and implementation, specifically considering unknowns and fostering innovation. We highlight examples of expertise in each realm and demonstrate how fragmentation currently precludes clear identification of research integration and implementation expertise. Third, in exploring ‘what is required to strengthen expertise in research integration and implementation?,’ we propose building a knowledge bank. We delve into three key challenges: compiling existing expertise, indexing and organising the expertise to make it widely accessible, and understanding and overcoming the core reasons for the existing fragmentation. A growing knowledge bank of expertise in research integration and implementation on the one hand, and accumulating success in addressing complex societal and environmental problems on the other, will form a virtuous cycle so that each strengthens the other. Building a coalition of researchers and institutions will ensure this expertise and its application are valued and sustained.

continues in source:

Expertise in research integration and implementation for tackling complex problems: when is it needed, where can it be found and how can it be strengthened? | Humanities and Social Sciences Communications

Systems Change | Ashoka Europe Fellowship Program (paid training)

I assume that the course content is much deeper than the outline might seem to suggest.

Systems Change

Systems Change | Ashoka Europe Fellowship Program

Systems Change

“I found the whole course to be extremely useful and effective: it helped us move forward and look at our system journey in a larger picture.”

(Feedback from former participant of the Systems Change course)

Download the System Change flyer here!

Registrations are open!

Please register until August 24, 2021.

Apply Here!

What is this module all about? 

Look Deeper: Aim For Systems Change! 

In this essential strategy course, we share back the key insights Ashoka has learned from its Fellows on their most powerful strategies to achieve systems change.

The systems change course consists of 8 modules to craft your own systems change strategy based on proven frameworks for scaling social impact in any sector. Each module contains videos explaining the main frameworks and how to apply them to the exercises of the workbook which build on each other to produce a complete system change strategy in the end.

Join this course to analyse your system and identify a range of practical interventions to scale your impact on the system – without necessarily growing your organization. This is an opportunity to meet some of the most innovative social entrepreneurs and deep dive into systems change strategies together.

We are convinced: To make a longer-lasting difference and maximise the impact of available resources, social change must ultimately address the root causes and systemic drivers that are producing a social problem. By taking an indirect impact approach such as changing policies, industry norms, power structures, incentives, mindsets and more, social entrepreneurs can shift a system to produce better outcomes itself and as a result achieve a significantly greater and longer lasting change.

For a brief high-level introduction to systems change, read a summary of key concepts here. For some practical case studies and insights listen to our systems change podcast series with Ashoka Fellows from around the world.

Module Timeline

The time requirement for this course is a minimum of 3 hours per module, for more advanced results 4-5h. This includes at least 1.5h+ to watch the videos and complete the exercises plus a 1.5h peer-learning session for each module where participants share and discuss their strategy progress and insights based on the completed exercises.

Access to the online learning modules including videos, workbook with exercises, and additional resources is provided two weeks before the start of the course. Exercise results and insights are then discussed in the below facilitated group sessions for peer-to-peer learning.

Bi-weekly sessions Wednesdays, 2- 3:30pm CET starting September 2021.

8/09 Module 1: Introduction: What Systems Change is and Why it Matters

22/09 Module 2: The Power of Root Cause Analysis

6/10 Module 3: Systems Analysis: Find your Targeted System Change

20/10 Module 4: Map Your Systems Change Story

3/11 Module 5: Ways to Achieve your Goal: Deep dive into your Systems Change


 Weekly sessions Wednesdays, 2-3:30pm CET in November 2021.

10/11 Module 6: Leverage the Power of Systemic Collaboration

17/11 Module 7: Develop New Leadership Skills for Systems Change

24/11 Module 8 & Final Workshop: Align Funding and Evaluation with Systems Change & Final Workshop. 

What is needed to institutionalise transdisciplinarity? – Integration and Implementation Insights

source:

What is needed to institutionalise transdisciplinarity? – Integration and Implementation Insights

What is needed to institutionalise transdisciplinarity?

August 3, 2021

By Gabriele Bammer

What are the indicators that transdisciplinarity has been institutionalised? How close is it? What still needs to be done to achieve institutionalisation?

Transdisciplinary teaching and research are becoming more common in universities and a range of research organisations. So how will we know that transdisciplinarity is an integral and accepted part of the research and higher education scene, nationally and internationally?

I suggest that there are two primary criteria:

  1. The expertise required to undertake transdisciplinary research is recognized and codified
  2. Acknowledged transdisciplinary experts are given an equal voice with established disciplines when research and higher education policy are made and when funding is allocated.

On these criteria, it is fair to say that transdisciplinarity is not even close to being institutionalised. As colleagues and I have suggested in How can expertise in research integration and implementation help tackle complex problems? we are only beginning to define the expertise that transdisciplinarians have. In addition, when transdisciplinarity is discussed at the research policy and higher education tables, it is rare for those involved to be acknowledged transdisciplinary experts. Similarly, acknowledged transdisciplinary experts are not yet routinely involved either in setting the policies of funding organisations or in reviewing relevant grants.

Nevertheless, there is growing acknowledgement of the importance of transdisciplinarity, along with funding for projects that tackle complex problems. Those interested in leveraging these advances to achieve institutionalization must:

  1. Unite!
  2. Organise!
  3. Respond!
  4. Fight!

Why are these actions necessary and how can they best be achieved?

continues in source

What is needed to institutionalise transdisciplinarity? – Integration and Implementation Insights

Nature Is Not a Machine—We Treat It So at Our Peril

Patterns of Meaning


First published as “Nature Is a Jazz Band, Not a Machine” by Institute of Art and Ideas | News on July 30, 2021.


From genetic engineering to geoengineering, we treat nature as though it’s a machine. This view of nature is deeply embedded in Western thought, but it’s a fundamental misconception with potentially disastrous consequences.

Climate change, avers Rex Tillerson, ex-CEO of ExxonMobil and erstwhile US Secretary of State, “is an engineering problem, and it has engineering solutions.” This brief statement encapsulates how the metaphor of the machine underlies the way our mainstream culture views the natural world. It also hints at the grievous dangers involved in perceiving nature in this way.

Rex Tillerson: a powerful and highly destructive proponent of treating nature as an engineering problem

This mechanistic worldview has deep roots in Western thought. The great pioneers of the Scientific Revolution, such as Galileo, Kepler, and…

View original post 2,176 more words

Soft Systems Methodology: Puzzles and Organisations – Neil Richardson

Soft Systems Methodology: Puzzles and Organisations by Neil Richardson Published: 26 June 2021

Soft Systems Methodology: Puzzles and Organisations

Cybernetics Society AGM Keynote 2021: Delia Pembrey MacNamara – and other CybSoc videos

Cybernetics Society AGM Keynote 2021: Delia Pembry MacNamara

Cybernetics Society AGM Keynote 2021: Delia Pembry MacNamara – YouTube

See the rest of the channel at

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCdp8cnKqLZxkgM8fmCO7TCA

Minimal physicalism as a scale-free substrate for cognition and consciousness | Fields, Glazebrook, Levin (2021)

Minimal physicalism as a scale-free substrate for cognition and consciousness

Minimal physicalism as a scale-free substrate for cognition and consciousness | Neuroscience of Consciousness | Oxford Academic

Minimal physicalism as a scale-free substrate for cognition and consciousness 

Chris FieldsJames F GlazebrookMichael Levin

Neuroscience of Consciousness, Volume 2021, Issue 2, 2021, niab013, https://doi.org/10.1093/nc/niab013

Published: 02 August 2021 Article history

Abstract

Theories of consciousness and cognition that assume a neural substrate automatically regard phylogenetically basal, nonneural systems as nonconscious and noncognitive. Here, we advance a scale-free characterization of consciousness and cognition that regards basal systems, including synthetic constructs, as not only informative about the structure and function of experience in more complex systems but also as offering distinct advantages for experimental manipulation. Our “minimal physicalist” approach makes no assumptions beyond those of quantum information theory, and hence is applicable from the molecular scale upwards. We show that standard concepts including integrated information, state broadcasting via small-world networks, and hierarchical Bayesian inference emerge naturally in this setting, and that common phenomena including stigmergic memory, perceptual coarse-graining, and attention switching follow directly from the thermodynamic requirements of classical computation. We show that the self-representation that lies at the heart of human autonoetic awareness can be traced as far back as, and serves the same basic functions as, the stress response in bacteria and other basal systems.

Making Systems Thinking Accessible to all Generations, Geographies & Work Groups | Meetup – Systems at Play Thursday, August 12, 2021 3:00 AM BST

book at source:

Making Systems Thinking Accessible to all Generations, Geographies & Work Groups | Meetup
No alternative text description for this image

Register for the free event from this link: https://www.meetup.com/systems-at-play/events/279605763/

To view previous recording and subscribe to the Systems At Play youtube channel please visit https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCo3t9w3qN0JNOCoIQIEyFnw

Water’s Centre Website:
https://waterscenterst.org/

Thursday, August 12, 2021

Making Systems Thinking Accessible to all Generations, Geographies & Work Groups

David WitneyHosted by
David Witney and 2 others
Systems At PlayPrivate group?Thursday, August 12, 2021
3:00 AM to 4:00 AM BST

Add to calendar

Online event

Link visible for attendeesReport this event

Details

Making Systems Thinking Accessible to All Generations, Geographies and Work Groups

Tracy is joining us from the US so we have had to adjust our regular timing to a lunch session for those in Australia.

Over the past few decades, the Waters Center for Systems Thinking has been a go-to organisation for systems thinking in primary and secondary education throughout the United States and beyond.

Their practical, creative and customised approach has generated an expanded network throughout diverse sectors including government agencies, medical and health system science educators, social justice advocates, and business and community organisations.

This session will provide a glimpse into Waters Center methodologies and will actively engage participants along the way.

About Tracy
As President of the Waters Center for Systems Thinking (nonprofit), Tracy Benson Ed.D leads a team of experienced systems thinking educators who provide ST capacity building, coaching and facilitation to a wide range of education, government, for-profit, and community-based organizations.
Her previous 25+ years career in education included teaching and administrative positions at all levels spanning early childhood through higher education.

As a researcher, consultant and author of several books, Tracy’s passion and commitment echo the Waters Center’s mission:

To make the benefits of systems thinking accessible to everyone.

Riding the Waves of Change: Developing Managerial Competencies for a Turbulent World – Gareth Morgan (1988)

Riding the Waves of Change

Riding the Waves of Change

Riding the Waves of Change

Thumbnail
View/Open

 191042_Riding_the_waves_of_change_010614_FINAL.pdf (12.83Mb)

Date

2013

Author

Morgan, Gareth

Metadata

Show full item recordIn developing managerial competencies it s not enough to “look in the rear view mirror”, project past trends, and just do what’s worked in the past. It’s crucial to look ahead, and position for the future. In today’s world competence rests in our attitudes, values and mindsets, not just in technical skills. Riding the Waves of Change, first published in 1988, still resonates today. New preface 2009.

Understanding and investigating relationality in the capability approach – Owens et al (2021)

Understanding and investigating relationality in the capability approach John Owens,Vikki A. Entwistle,Luke K. Craven,Ina Conradie

Understanding and investigating relationality in the capability approach – Owens – – Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour – Wiley Online Library

Boundary Objects: A Field Guide – Sveta Stoytcheva

source:

Part I: What is a Boundary Object?

Alan Watts – Being in the Way – Ep. 2 – Dropping Out From Karma – Be Here Now Network 2021

Alan Watts – Being in the Way – Ep. 2 – Dropping Out From Karma

Alan Watts – Being in the Way – Ep. 2 – Dropping Out From Karma – Be Here Now Network 2021

We need a bit of Watts or Ram Dass here every now and again, I’m contractually obliged or you’ll think I’ve gone straight 😉

This struck me (especially the Daoist part) as particularly systems-y.

Please note I have spare you the very exciteable conversation between Jordan Peterson and John Vervaeke – not becuase I didn’t get a lot of good notes out of it (the robust organisations model as a metaphor for good team capabilities and an explanation for the evolution of personality types?), but becuase if I am shouting ‘just shut up and let him talk!’ multiple times at JBP, I can only imagine the reaction it would get in the groups…

Power & Systems Change: A Conversation between Anna Birney & Adam Kahane | Forum for the Future

book at:

Power & Systems Change: A Conversation between Anna Birney & Adam Kahane | Forum for the Future

Power & Systems Change: A Conversation between Anna Birney & Adam Kahane

Power & Systems Change: A Conversation between Anna Birney & Adam Kahane

Join the conversation – book your free ticket.

Date: 9 September 2021 

Time: 16:00 – 17:00 BST | 17:00 – 18:00 CEST | 08:00 – 9:00 PT | 11:00 – 12:00 ET

Power is an increasingly prominent question for systems change practitioners and yet it is often difficult to engage with or to fully understand.

As consciously powerful actors in the field, Anna Birney (School of System Change) and Adam Kahane (Reos Partners) speak to the importance of acknowledging and being aware of your own power as a facilitator, and the dynamics of relationships, participation and how that contributes to transformation.

This webinar will be a conversation between the two based on their experience and reflections, inviting others into the inquiry on power and its role in systems change.