Frontiers | The Fallacy of Univariate Solutions to Complex Systems Problems | Neuroscience

 

Source: Frontiers | The Fallacy of Univariate Solutions to Complex Systems Problems | Neuroscience

PERSPECTIVE ARTICLE

Front. Neurosci., 08 June 2016 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fnins.2016.00267

The Fallacy of Univariate Solutions to Complex Systems Problems

  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
  • 2Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
  • 3Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
  • 4Department of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
  • 5Department of Neuroscience, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA

Complex biological systems, by definition, are composed of multiple components that interact non-linearly. The human brain constitutes, arguably, the most complex biological system known. Yet most investigation of the brain and its function is carried out using assumptions appropriate for simple systems—univariate design and linear statistical approaches. This heuristic must change before we can hope to discover and test interventions to improve the lives of individuals with complex disorders of brain development and function. Indeed, a movement away from simplistic models of biological systems will benefit essentially all domains of biology and medicine. The present brief essay lays the foundation for this argument.

Introduction

Non-invasive neuroimaging has invigorated a deep and abiding interest in understanding the human brain, the most complex biological system, in health and disease. This burgeoning research focus has impelled technological innovation in neuroimaging and application of a growing number of mathematical/computational approaches to analysis, which help visualize the complexity of the brain in greater depth than previously possible. From our current vantage point we are compelled to ask whether our capabilities have outstripped the paradigms we use for scientific research, and whether our conceptual and analytical frameworks have become a barrier to understanding complex systems.

A deep understanding of complex biological systems requires conceptual and analytical strategies that respect that complexity. Yet, there continues to be a dominating focus in experimental design and analysis on univariate, linear, and narrowly defined relationships. These approaches, including multivariate linear regression (which is an elaboration on the univariate linear framework), are gratifying because they are conceptually simple and align neatly with the traditional scientific method, in which emphasis is placed on a single isolatable dependent variable. However, the univariate/linear approach will necessarily fail when tasked with providing the basis for deep explanations for complex biological systems.

This essay highlights the need to recognize the fallacy of the univariate conceptual framework with respect to complex systems and to embrace complexity so as to align the problem to be solved with the approach taken. We contend that there are some effective ways to study complex systems through care in study design and sample ascertainment, deep phenotyping, and statistical approaches. However, the shift to individual-level analysis, the basis for personalized medicine, will require both methodological advances and a readiness for investigators and reviewers to eschew biologically implausible reductionist models of complex biology.

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