Hull, UK, 27 April 2020 – Peter Senge at the Centre for Systems Studies 2020 annual Mike Jackson lecture on Systems Thinking, and SCiO open event

 

During the day, there is an open day from SCiO (systems and complexity in organisation – the systems practitioner organisation) with a number of excellent speakers, plus m’good self – http://systemspractice.org/events

  • Tony Korycki: Introducing Critical Systems Heuristics
  • Ray Ison & Ed Straw: The Hidden Power of Systems Thinking – Governance in a climate emergency
  • Patrick Hoverstadt: Buried treasure – using systems laws and principles
  • Steve Whittla – title tba
  • Benjamin Taylor: The ‘four quadrants of thinking threats’

(And on Sunday, if you join SCiO, there’s a collaborative, open agenda Development Day – see www.systemspractice.org for more)

Then in the early evening, the Mike Jackson lecture with special guest Peter Senge:

via THE CENTRE FOR SYSTEMS STUDIES 2020 ANNUAL MIKE JACKSON LECTURE ON SYSTEMS THINKING | CultureNet

THE FIFTH DISCIPLINE: MAKING THE FUTURE A FRIENDLY PLACE FOR HUMANKIND

DATE 27 April 2020

TIME 6.00pm

REGISTER YOUR PLACE BOOK NOW

Lecture

Join us for an evening with Dr Peter Senge, named as one of the world’s top management gurus by the Financial Times and BusinessWeek, and by the Schwab Foundation as one of the Global Thought Leaders in Social Innovation.

We live in a world of increasingly complex and intractable problems.  The Industrial Age model of progress harvesting social and natural capital to produce financial capital is not sustainable.  In a refreshingly non-dystopian analysis, Dr Peter Senge uses Systems Thinking to make visible a different, viable, future that is already emerging today: as they say in traditional Chinese culture, “You cannot move the river; dig a channel and the river moves itself.”

THE TALK: For over two hundred years, we have been harvesting social and natural capital to produce financial capital. This is not sustainable, as we are reminded by the global youth climate change movement. But climate change is more symptom than cause. The destruction of ecosystems and the disproportionate effects that growing scarcities of natural resources are having on the poor of the world, all call for a shift in how we perceive human progress. The still dominant Industrial Age model of progress has morphed into today’s obsession with technology, social media, and divisive politics – making the world an increasingly unhappy place.

The essence of systems thinking is to look beyond problem symptoms and better understand the forces that keep problems in place and how these can be shifted. In this Lecture Dr Senge takes us through the trajectory of his thinking, from the sensational success of his best-selling book The Fifth Discipline to his current focus on basic innovation in education, embodied in the ‘compassionate systems’ perspective being developed in schools around the world. While we face a short-term mandate to listen to one another and find pathways to moderation, this is unlikely to happen without a compelling image of ways of living that can build a future viable for our children and the living systems upon which we all depend. Rather than a utopian vision, such a future is already emerging today and will grow to the extent we cultivate ways of seeing it. In traditional Chinese culture they say, “You cannot move the river; dig a channel and the river moves itself.”

The Annual Mike Jackson lecture has been made possible by the support of University of Hull honorary graduate, Dr Andrew Chen, and is in recognition of the work of Professor Mike Jackson, former Dean of Hull University Business School and world-renowned academic in the field of systems thinking.

THE SPEAKER

Dr. Peter Senge is senior lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management and the founding chair of the Society for Organizational Learning (SoL), a global community of corporations, researchers, and consultants dedicated to the “interdependent development of people and their institutions.” He was named as one of the world’s top management gurus by the Financial Times and BusinessWeek, and by the Schwab Foundation as one of the Global Thought Leaders in Social Innovation. His 1990 book, The Fifth Discipline: The Art and Practice of the Learning Organization sold over a million copies worldwide, acclaimed by the Harvard Business Review in 1997 as one of the seminal management books of the past 75 years.

Dr Senge has lectured extensively throughout the world, translating the abstract ideas of systems theory into tools for the better understanding of economic and organizational change. Leading business periodicals including BusinessWeek, Fortune, Fast Company, and Sloan Management Review, have featured his work with colleagues at MIT and SoL. His work articulates a cornerstone position of human values in the workplace; namely, that vision, purpose, reflectiveness, and systems thinking are essential if organizations are to realize their potential.

ABOUT THE CENTRE FOR SYSTEMS STUDIES

The Centre for Systems Studies is an international centre of excellence for ground breaking research on systems thinking and practice. Today’s interconnected world presents novel challenges and opportunities for business and society. The interplay of social, technological, environmental and geo-political factors confronts decision makers with unprecedented complexity. Our challenge is to develop the new concepts and methodological approaches needed to address that complexity. Our research is concerned with advancing the understanding of complex phenomena– from the emergence of local community action and business ecosystems through to the impact of global policy interventions and climate change. We work in trans-disciplinary teams, collaborating with practitioners in public, private and third-sector organisations, and our ideas and methods are tested and refined in a broad range of application areas. Current collaborations include projects in health, policy analysis, development, resilience and sustainability of socio-economic systems and the environment, the digital economy and society, food security, cybersecurity, the low-carbon economy, radicalisation and marginalisation, innovation and community operational research

 

via THE CENTRE FOR SYSTEMS STUDIES 2020 ANNUAL MIKE JACKSON LECTURE ON SYSTEMS THINKING | CultureNet