The Obviousness Trap: Double Yellow Lines And The Danger Of Unrecognised Misunderstandings | Adrian Reed’s Blog

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The Obviousness Trap: Double Yellow Lines And The Danger Of Unrecognised Misunderstandings | Adrian Reed’s Blog

The Obviousness Trap: Double Yellow Lines And The Danger Of Unrecognised Misunderstandings

Progressing change is an inherently human endeavour.  It doesn’t really matter how slick a change ‘process’ is, if people aren’t on-board with a common understanding of what needs to change then the initiative is unlikely to be as successful as it otherwise could have been.

One challenge that we face when working with others is communication.  It’s very easy to discuss something with a group of stakeholders and appear to reach a consensus, only later to find that everyone in the room had a slightly different understanding of what was being discussed.  Precise communication is difficult even amongst professionals who supposedly have a shared professional language, and words and symbols can be interpreted subtly differently leading to vast misunderstandings.

This might sound crazy, so let’s take an example.  I suspect many people reading this blog will have a driving licence, and many people reading this will have a driving licence issued within a country that allows them to drive a car in the UK.  Even if you don’t, you probably have a vague awareness of the meaning of road markings and signs.  So, here’s a quiz for you, what does this set of road markings mean?  It’s not a trick question, I promise, so go ahead and shout the answer at the screen!

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The Obviousness Trap: Double Yellow Lines And The Danger Of Unrecognised Misunderstandings | Adrian Reed’s Blog