Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders – Centre for Public Impact (CPI)

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Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders – Centre for Public Impact (CPI)

DECEMBER 3, 2020 5 minute read

Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders

Asia & Oceania

LegitimacyInnovation

As we hurtle towards the end of 2020, now feels like a good time to stop and look back at the year that has been; a year of disruption and pain, but also innovation and opportunity. To support this process of reflection, the Observatory of Public Sector Innovation convened a series of global events under the banner of “Government After Shock”. Around the world, the Government After Shock events took different forms, and focused on different themes. But all were connected by three key questions – what do we need to leave behind, what do we want to keep, and what should we do differently?

CPI hosted three Government After Shock events from our teams across the globe – WashingtonLondon and Melbourne. This article captures our reflections from the Melbourne event, which explored Thinking in Systems in Government. Specifically, the session focused on exploring the following: 

To build on the momentum that COVID has generated around thinking in systems, what do we need to keep doing, believing and being; what do we need to leave behind, and what do we need to start doing, believing and being?

The discussion was led by Dr Seanna Davidson from The Systems School, Angie Tangaere from The Southern Initiative, Misha Kaur from the Australian Taxation Office, Professor of Systems Ray Ison from the Open University and Sam Rye from Conservation Volunteers Australia.

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Is there really a place for systems thinking in government? What we’re hearing from thought leaders – Centre for Public Impact (CPI)