The Double Diamond as an example of some challenges of attribution in the history of ideas

the once-chosen path

I just did a LinkedIn post picking up on this story, triggered by comments by (of course) Peter Jones (here: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn%3Ali%3Aactivity%3A6795377460289552385/?commentUrn=urn%3Ali%3Acomment%3A%28activity%3A6794267881786896384%2C6795377440865746944%29), around the origins of the Design Council’s ‘double diamond’.

(NB Peter also comments on their new version, dubbed ‘The Systemic Design Framework’, here: https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn%3Ali%3Aactivity%3A6795386355506561024/?commentUrn=urn%3Ali%3Acomment%3A%28activity%3A6794016102427963392%2C6795386297960710144%29)


Please see the post first:

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/antlerboy_doublediamond-designthinking-servicedesign-activity-6795601313569882112-pEL_


I’m picking this up because it seems there’s no malice or ill-will or allegations around this (unlike other examples – see this stinging review of Wolfram’s work, recently posted here: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/antlerboy_doublediamond-designthinking-servicedesign-activity-6795601313569882112-pEL_

And because intellectual history seems to be important to me, and I’m aware of how hard this can be!

Disclaimer: while I *constantly* work with the ideas of others – and try to credit them, always aware there’s a line between ‘their idea’, ‘my interpretation of their idea’, ‘my idea influenced by this and this’, and ‘my idea which is importantly distinct from this part of intellectual history…

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