Homeotely – by John Dobbin – Post Bureaucracy

Homeotely Whole-maintaining systems and organisations John Dobbin

Homeotely – by John Dobbin – Post Bureaucracy

Homeotely

Whole-maintaining systems and organisations

John Dobbin

“One cannot help being struck by the way in which the cells in an organism not only cooperate but cooperate in a specific direction towards the fulfilment and maintenance of the type of the particular organism which they constitute.” — Jan Smuts


One of the most remarkable aspects of natural systems is their ability to work together autonomously to maintain the critical order of the larger systems to which they belong. Components appear to share the common goal of maintaining the stability of their encompassing system, and in doing so maintain their own stability. 

We see this phenomenon occurring at every level. Organelles work together autonomously to maintain the critical order of a cell. Cells work together autonomously to maintain the critical order of an organ. Organs work together autonomously to maintain the critical order of a body. Many different species work together autonomously to maintain the critical order of an ecosystem. And the Earth’s ecosystems work together autonomously to maintain the critical order of the biosphere.

Because there was no adequate word in English to describe this whole-maintaining characteristic of systems, environmentalist and philosopher Teddy Goldsmith coined the term Homeotely — from the greek homo (same) and telos (goal) — to describe this fundamental principle that underlies all healthy natural systems.1

continues in source:

Homeotely – by John Dobbin – Post Bureaucracy