Improvisation Blog: Creatively defacing my copy of Simon Critchley’s “Tragedy, the Greeks and Us”

 

Source: Improvisation Blog: Creatively defacing my copy of Simon Critchley’s “Tragedy, the Greeks and Us”

Sunday, 6 October 2019

Creatively defacing my copy of Simon Critchley’s “Tragedy, the Greeks and Us”

I’ve been defacing my copy of Simon Critchley’s “Tragedy, the Greeks and Us”. For me, this vandalism is a sign that something has got me thinking. It’s not just Critchley. I went back to Jane Harrisson’s “Ancient Art and Ritual” the other day, partly in response to my recent experiences in Vladivostok and a central question concerning the structure of drama and the structure of education. Basically: is education drama? Should it be? and, Is our experience online drama? Critchley’s not dismissive of Harrison and the Cambridge ritualists – which I find encouraging – and I like his suggestion that art may not be so much “ritual” as “meta-ritual”.
It’s funny how things revolve. I was introduced to Harrison by Ian Kemp at Manchester university as a student, who was also a passionate expert on Berlioz. Yesterday evening I took my daughter to hear a performance of Berlioz’s Romeo et Juliette, which is Berlioz’s brilliant and beautiful refashioning of Shakespeare into the form of a symphony via Greek drama: it has explicit sections of chorus, prologue, sacrifice, feast, etc. Beethoven meets the Greeks!
I’m very impressed with Critchley – and I very much get his vibe at the moment – that tragedy and the ambiguity of dramatic structure was overlooked in favour of philosophy (Plato particularly), and that we are now in a mess because of it. I agree. If we replace “tradegy” with “the drama of learning” or “the dialectic of self-discovery” then I think there are some important lessons for education. Critchley makes the point that our modern lives are determined by endless categorisation, and the resulting incoherence of this drives us back to Facebook and social media:

“We look, but we see nothing. Someone speaks to us, but we hear nothing. And we carry on in our endlessly narcissistic self-justification, adding Facebook updates and posting on Instagram. Tragedy is about many things, but it is centrally concerned with the conditions for actually seeing and actually hearing”

That’s what I was missing in “The Twittering Machine”.
But he has an axe to grind about philosophy and Plato – and particularly with his contemporary philosophers, most notably Alain Badiou. Since Badiou also has a deep interest in the arts (and opera particularly) this is interesting, and I think Critchley is seeing a dichotomy where there isn’t one. And that is where my doodling starts…
The essence of this goes back to the relationship between the synchronic, categorical frame of rationality and experience which demarcates times, and the diachronic, ambiguous frame which sees time as a continuous process. Critchley doesn’t seem to see that the two are compatible. But I think they are in a fundamental way.
The issue concerns what a distinction is, and the relationship of a distinction to time. We imaging that distinctions are made in time, and that time pre-exists any distinction. But it is possible that a distinction – the drawing of a boundary – entails the creation of time. So this was my first doodle:

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