Systems thinking as a pathway to global warming beliefs and attitudes through an ecological worldview | PNAS- various authors (2019)

source:

Systems thinking as a pathwasy to global warming beliefs and attitudes through an ecological worldview | PNAS

Matthew T. Ballew, Matthew H. Goldberg, Seth A. Rosenthal, Abel Gustafson, and Anthony LeiserowitzPNAS April 23, 2019 116 (17) 8214-8219; first published April 8, 2019 https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1819310116

  1. Edited by Arild Underdal, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway, and approved March 8, 2019 (received for review November 26, 2018)

Significance

Systems thinking is recognized as vital to understanding climate science and addressing climate change. Understanding how systems thinking influences the public’s beliefs and attitudes about climate change has important implications for climate change education and communication. Our findings indicate that across the political spectrum, systems thinking may facilitate an ecological ethic or value system that humans should preserve and protect the natural world rather than exploit it. This, in turn, may strengthen proclimate views and understanding of climate change (e.g., that global warming is happening, is human-caused, etc.). The findings contribute to systems thinking theory and indicate the importance of promoting systems thinking to support proclimate science beliefs, attitudes, and behaviors across political lines.

source:

Systems thinking as a pathway to global warming beliefs and attitudes through an ecological worldview | PNAS