Transactionalism – Wikipedia

Transactionalism From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Transactionalism is a pragmatic philosophical approach that views social exchange as a fundamental aspect of human existence; all human interactivity is best understood as a set of transactions within a reciprocal and co-constitutive exchange. A transactionalist approach is an “unfractured observation” of human being as an organism who shapes and is shaped by their environment (“organism-environment”), always thinking of themself as embedded within and constituted by their situated-ness in a specific time and place.[1] It is critical, therefore, to keep in mind that “consequences and outcomes”[2] of a human endeavor are affected by three aspects of experience beyond one’s intention — the observer in the situation, the process of observing, and the thing observed — that are all “affected by whatever merits or defects [the situation] may prove to have when it is judged”.[3] A transactionalist holds that all human acts, including learning,[4] are best understood as “entities” within a transactional whole shaped biologically, socio-linguistically, and trans-actionally within and by an ecology within other ecologies. A person is shaped by their body and health as an ecology, their language and its common discourses and ideologies, and by their ability to trans-act to make a satisfactory living given those and other necessary conditions of life.

Transactionalism – Wikipedia